Synthetic bone substitutes

Lichun Lu, Bradford L. Currier, Michael J Yaszemski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bone transplantation via autograft or allograft is an essential component of surgical management for a variety of skeletal defects. The nondegradable poly(methylmethacrylate) finds use as a bone graft alternative in certain limited clinical situations. There is an array of degradable, synthetic alternatives to these existing choices on the clinical use horizon. These alternatives include a variety of polymeric and ceramic composite materials that can provide immediate structural stability to the reconstructed region. In addition, these materials can deliver cells and growth factors to direct the bone regeneration process. This review discusses recent work in this rapidly evolving field of bone tissue engineering. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-390
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Orthopaedics
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Bone Substitutes
Methylmethacrylate
Bone and Bones
Bone Regeneration
Bone Transplantation
Autografts
Ceramics
Tissue Engineering
Allografts
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Synthetic bone substitutes. / Lu, Lichun; Currier, Bradford L.; Yaszemski, Michael J.

In: Current Opinion in Orthopaedics, Vol. 11, No. 5, 2000, p. 383-390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lu, Lichun ; Currier, Bradford L. ; Yaszemski, Michael J. / Synthetic bone substitutes. In: Current Opinion in Orthopaedics. 2000 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 383-390.
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