Survival trends among non-small-cell lung cancer patients over a decade: impact of initial therapy at academic centers

Yanyan Lou, Bhagirathbhai Dholaria, Aixa Soyano, David Hodge, Jordan Cochuyt, Rami Manochakian, Stephen J. Ko, Mathew Thomas, Margaret Johnson, Neal M. Patel, Robert C. Miller, Alex Adjei, Sikander Ailawadhi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been rapidly advancing over the last decade. Academic centers are considered equipped with better expertise. NSCLC outcome trends in novel therapeutic era and impact of initial treatment at academic centers have not been reported. Methods: The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was used to identify NSCLC incident cases from 2004 to 2013. Overall survival (OS) was plotted by year of diagnosis and type of initial treatment center, accounting for several factors available in NCDB. Results: A total of 1 150 722 NSCLC patients were included and separated by initial treatment center type (academic: 31.5%; nonacademic: 68.5%). Median follow-up and OS for all patients were 11.8 months (range: 0-133.6 months) and 13.1 months (95% CI: 13.08-13.17), respectively. Median OS improved significantly for those diagnosed in 2010-2013 (14.8 months [95% CI: 14.7-14.9]) as compared to 2004-2009 (12.4 months [95% CI: 12.3-12.5]) (P < 0.001). Treatment at academic centers was associated with improved OS (multivariate HR for OS = 0.929 [95% CI: 0.92-0.94], P < 0.0010). Four-year OS for academic and nonacademic cohorts was 28.5%% and 22.1%, respectively (P < 0.001), and the difference was more pronounced in stage I to III NSCLC. Conclusion: In this largest analysis, thus far, NSCLC survival has improved over time, and type of initial treatment center significantly influences survival. Identifying and removing barriers to obtaining initial treatment of NSCLC at academic medical centers could improve OS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCancer Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Survival
Therapeutics
Databases
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • academic center
  • community center
  • National Cancer Database
  • non-small-cell lung cancer
  • outcome disparities
  • treatment center type

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Survival trends among non-small-cell lung cancer patients over a decade : impact of initial therapy at academic centers. / Lou, Yanyan; Dholaria, Bhagirathbhai; Soyano, Aixa; Hodge, David; Cochuyt, Jordan; Manochakian, Rami; Ko, Stephen J.; Thomas, Mathew; Johnson, Margaret; Patel, Neal M.; Miller, Robert C.; Adjei, Alex; Ailawadhi, Sikander.

In: Cancer Medicine, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lou, Yanyan ; Dholaria, Bhagirathbhai ; Soyano, Aixa ; Hodge, David ; Cochuyt, Jordan ; Manochakian, Rami ; Ko, Stephen J. ; Thomas, Mathew ; Johnson, Margaret ; Patel, Neal M. ; Miller, Robert C. ; Adjei, Alex ; Ailawadhi, Sikander. / Survival trends among non-small-cell lung cancer patients over a decade : impact of initial therapy at academic centers. In: Cancer Medicine. 2018.
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abstract = "Background: Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been rapidly advancing over the last decade. Academic centers are considered equipped with better expertise. NSCLC outcome trends in novel therapeutic era and impact of initial treatment at academic centers have not been reported. Methods: The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was used to identify NSCLC incident cases from 2004 to 2013. Overall survival (OS) was plotted by year of diagnosis and type of initial treatment center, accounting for several factors available in NCDB. Results: A total of 1 150 722 NSCLC patients were included and separated by initial treatment center type (academic: 31.5{\%}; nonacademic: 68.5{\%}). Median follow-up and OS for all patients were 11.8 months (range: 0-133.6 months) and 13.1 months (95{\%} CI: 13.08-13.17), respectively. Median OS improved significantly for those diagnosed in 2010-2013 (14.8 months [95{\%} CI: 14.7-14.9]) as compared to 2004-2009 (12.4 months [95{\%} CI: 12.3-12.5]) (P < 0.001). Treatment at academic centers was associated with improved OS (multivariate HR for OS = 0.929 [95{\%} CI: 0.92-0.94], P < 0.0010). Four-year OS for academic and nonacademic cohorts was 28.5{\%}{\%} and 22.1{\%}, respectively (P < 0.001), and the difference was more pronounced in stage I to III NSCLC. Conclusion: In this largest analysis, thus far, NSCLC survival has improved over time, and type of initial treatment center significantly influences survival. Identifying and removing barriers to obtaining initial treatment of NSCLC at academic medical centers could improve OS.",
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AU - Lou, Yanyan

AU - Dholaria, Bhagirathbhai

AU - Soyano, Aixa

AU - Hodge, David

AU - Cochuyt, Jordan

AU - Manochakian, Rami

AU - Ko, Stephen J.

AU - Thomas, Mathew

AU - Johnson, Margaret

AU - Patel, Neal M.

AU - Miller, Robert C.

AU - Adjei, Alex

AU - Ailawadhi, Sikander

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AB - Background: Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been rapidly advancing over the last decade. Academic centers are considered equipped with better expertise. NSCLC outcome trends in novel therapeutic era and impact of initial treatment at academic centers have not been reported. Methods: The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was used to identify NSCLC incident cases from 2004 to 2013. Overall survival (OS) was plotted by year of diagnosis and type of initial treatment center, accounting for several factors available in NCDB. Results: A total of 1 150 722 NSCLC patients were included and separated by initial treatment center type (academic: 31.5%; nonacademic: 68.5%). Median follow-up and OS for all patients were 11.8 months (range: 0-133.6 months) and 13.1 months (95% CI: 13.08-13.17), respectively. Median OS improved significantly for those diagnosed in 2010-2013 (14.8 months [95% CI: 14.7-14.9]) as compared to 2004-2009 (12.4 months [95% CI: 12.3-12.5]) (P < 0.001). Treatment at academic centers was associated with improved OS (multivariate HR for OS = 0.929 [95% CI: 0.92-0.94], P < 0.0010). Four-year OS for academic and nonacademic cohorts was 28.5%% and 22.1%, respectively (P < 0.001), and the difference was more pronounced in stage I to III NSCLC. Conclusion: In this largest analysis, thus far, NSCLC survival has improved over time, and type of initial treatment center significantly influences survival. Identifying and removing barriers to obtaining initial treatment of NSCLC at academic medical centers could improve OS.

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