Survival disparities in Male patients with breast cancer

David J. Restrepo, Daniel Boczar, Maria T. Huayllani, Andrea Sisti, Sarah A. McLaughlin, Aaron Spaulding, Alexander S. Parker, Rickey E. Carter, Aaron L. Leppin, Antonio J. Forte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aim: We evaluated factors associated with mortality among men with breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We used the National Cancer Database to identify men with breast cancer and evaluated factors associated with mortality, using a Cox regression model. Results: Black patients experienced an increased risk of death from any cause compared to white patients [hazard ratio (HR)=1.19, 95%CI=1.05-1.37]. Patients with government insurance had a greater risk of death compared to privately insured patients (HR=1.57, 95%CI=1.41-1.75). When compared to patients with an income of >$46,000, those with an income <$30,000 presented an increased risk of death (HR=1.35, 95%CI=1.14-1.60). Finally, patients treated at a comprehensive community cancer program (HR=1.129, 95%CI=1.021-1.248), community cancer program (HR=1.164, 95%CI=1.010-1.343), or integrated network cancer program (HR=1.216; 95%CI=1.056-1.401) experienced elevated risk of death compared to those treated at academic/research-programs. Conclusion: Race, insurance, income, education, and facility type are associated with the risk of mortality in male patients with breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5669-5674
Number of pages6
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Breast Neoplasms
Survival
Insurance
Mortality
Neoplasms
Proportional Hazards Models
Cause of Death
Databases
Education
Research

Keywords

  • Breast neoplasm
  • Disparities
  • Income
  • Male
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Restrepo, D. J., Boczar, D., Huayllani, M. T., Sisti, A., McLaughlin, S. A., Spaulding, A., ... Forte, A. J. (2019). Survival disparities in Male patients with breast cancer. Anticancer Research, 39(10), 5669-5674. https://doi.org/10.21873/anticanres.13764

Survival disparities in Male patients with breast cancer. / Restrepo, David J.; Boczar, Daniel; Huayllani, Maria T.; Sisti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Sarah A.; Spaulding, Aaron; Parker, Alexander S.; Carter, Rickey E.; Leppin, Aaron L.; Forte, Antonio J.

In: Anticancer Research, Vol. 39, No. 10, 01.01.2019, p. 5669-5674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Restrepo, DJ, Boczar, D, Huayllani, MT, Sisti, A, McLaughlin, SA, Spaulding, A, Parker, AS, Carter, RE, Leppin, AL & Forte, AJ 2019, 'Survival disparities in Male patients with breast cancer', Anticancer Research, vol. 39, no. 10, pp. 5669-5674. https://doi.org/10.21873/anticanres.13764
Restrepo DJ, Boczar D, Huayllani MT, Sisti A, McLaughlin SA, Spaulding A et al. Survival disparities in Male patients with breast cancer. Anticancer Research. 2019 Jan 1;39(10):5669-5674. https://doi.org/10.21873/anticanres.13764
Restrepo, David J. ; Boczar, Daniel ; Huayllani, Maria T. ; Sisti, Andrea ; McLaughlin, Sarah A. ; Spaulding, Aaron ; Parker, Alexander S. ; Carter, Rickey E. ; Leppin, Aaron L. ; Forte, Antonio J. / Survival disparities in Male patients with breast cancer. In: Anticancer Research. 2019 ; Vol. 39, No. 10. pp. 5669-5674.
@article{b8b38e4eaa4e4135b219d7b5572d1569,
title = "Survival disparities in Male patients with breast cancer",
abstract = "Background/Aim: We evaluated factors associated with mortality among men with breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We used the National Cancer Database to identify men with breast cancer and evaluated factors associated with mortality, using a Cox regression model. Results: Black patients experienced an increased risk of death from any cause compared to white patients [hazard ratio (HR)=1.19, 95{\%}CI=1.05-1.37]. Patients with government insurance had a greater risk of death compared to privately insured patients (HR=1.57, 95{\%}CI=1.41-1.75). When compared to patients with an income of >$46,000, those with an income <$30,000 presented an increased risk of death (HR=1.35, 95{\%}CI=1.14-1.60). Finally, patients treated at a comprehensive community cancer program (HR=1.129, 95{\%}CI=1.021-1.248), community cancer program (HR=1.164, 95{\%}CI=1.010-1.343), or integrated network cancer program (HR=1.216; 95{\%}CI=1.056-1.401) experienced elevated risk of death compared to those treated at academic/research-programs. Conclusion: Race, insurance, income, education, and facility type are associated with the risk of mortality in male patients with breast cancer.",
keywords = "Breast neoplasm, Disparities, Income, Male, Survival",
author = "Restrepo, {David J.} and Daniel Boczar and Huayllani, {Maria T.} and Andrea Sisti and McLaughlin, {Sarah A.} and Aaron Spaulding and Parker, {Alexander S.} and Carter, {Rickey E.} and Leppin, {Aaron L.} and Forte, {Antonio J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.21873/anticanres.13764",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "5669--5674",
journal = "Anticancer Research",
issn = "0250-7005",
publisher = "International Institute of Anticancer Research",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Survival disparities in Male patients with breast cancer

AU - Restrepo, David J.

AU - Boczar, Daniel

AU - Huayllani, Maria T.

AU - Sisti, Andrea

AU - McLaughlin, Sarah A.

AU - Spaulding, Aaron

AU - Parker, Alexander S.

AU - Carter, Rickey E.

AU - Leppin, Aaron L.

AU - Forte, Antonio J.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background/Aim: We evaluated factors associated with mortality among men with breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We used the National Cancer Database to identify men with breast cancer and evaluated factors associated with mortality, using a Cox regression model. Results: Black patients experienced an increased risk of death from any cause compared to white patients [hazard ratio (HR)=1.19, 95%CI=1.05-1.37]. Patients with government insurance had a greater risk of death compared to privately insured patients (HR=1.57, 95%CI=1.41-1.75). When compared to patients with an income of >$46,000, those with an income <$30,000 presented an increased risk of death (HR=1.35, 95%CI=1.14-1.60). Finally, patients treated at a comprehensive community cancer program (HR=1.129, 95%CI=1.021-1.248), community cancer program (HR=1.164, 95%CI=1.010-1.343), or integrated network cancer program (HR=1.216; 95%CI=1.056-1.401) experienced elevated risk of death compared to those treated at academic/research-programs. Conclusion: Race, insurance, income, education, and facility type are associated with the risk of mortality in male patients with breast cancer.

AB - Background/Aim: We evaluated factors associated with mortality among men with breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We used the National Cancer Database to identify men with breast cancer and evaluated factors associated with mortality, using a Cox regression model. Results: Black patients experienced an increased risk of death from any cause compared to white patients [hazard ratio (HR)=1.19, 95%CI=1.05-1.37]. Patients with government insurance had a greater risk of death compared to privately insured patients (HR=1.57, 95%CI=1.41-1.75). When compared to patients with an income of >$46,000, those with an income <$30,000 presented an increased risk of death (HR=1.35, 95%CI=1.14-1.60). Finally, patients treated at a comprehensive community cancer program (HR=1.129, 95%CI=1.021-1.248), community cancer program (HR=1.164, 95%CI=1.010-1.343), or integrated network cancer program (HR=1.216; 95%CI=1.056-1.401) experienced elevated risk of death compared to those treated at academic/research-programs. Conclusion: Race, insurance, income, education, and facility type are associated with the risk of mortality in male patients with breast cancer.

KW - Breast neoplasm

KW - Disparities

KW - Income

KW - Male

KW - Survival

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072761831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85072761831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.21873/anticanres.13764

DO - 10.21873/anticanres.13764

M3 - Article

C2 - 31570465

AN - SCOPUS:85072761831

VL - 39

SP - 5669

EP - 5674

JO - Anticancer Research

JF - Anticancer Research

SN - 0250-7005

IS - 10

ER -