Survey of potential receptivity to robotic-assisted exercise coaching in a diverse sample of smokers and nonsmokers

Christi Ann Patten, James A. Levine, Ioannis Pavlidis, Joyce Balls-Berry, Arya Shah, Christine Hughes, Tabetha Brockman, Miguel Valdez Soto, Daniel Witt, Gabriel Koepp, Pamela Sinicrope, Jamie Richards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A prior project found that an intensive (12 weeks, thrice weekly sessions) in-person, supervised, exercise coaching intervention was effective for smoking cessation among depressed women smokers. However, the sample was 90% White and of high socioeconomic status, and the intensity of the intervention limits its reach. One approach to intervention scalability is to deliver the supervised exercise coaching using a robotic human exercise trainer. This is done in real time via an iPad tablet placed on a mobile robotic wheel base and controlled remotely by an iOS device or computer. As an initial step, this preliminary study surveyed potential receptivity to a robotic-assisted exercise coaching intervention among 100 adults recruited in two community settings, and explored the association of technology acceptance scores with smoking status and other demographics. Participants watched a brief demonstration of the robot-delivered exercise coaching and completed a 19-item survey assessing socio-demographics and technology receptivity measured by the 8-item Technology Acceptance Scale (TAS). Open-ended written feedback was obtained, and content analysis was used to derive themes from these data. Respondents were: 40% female, 56% unemployed, 41% racial minority, 38% current smoker, and 58% depression history. Mean total TAS score was 34.0 (SD = 5.5) of possible 40, indicating overall very good receptivity to the robotic-assisted exercise intervention concept. Racial minorities and unemployed participants reported greater technology acceptance than White (p = 0.015) and employed (p<0.001) respondents. No association was detected between the TAS score and smoking status, depression, gender or age groups. Qualitative feedback indicated the robot was perceived as a novel, motivating, way to increase intervention reach and accessibility, and the wave of the future. Robotic technology has potential applicability for exercise coaching in a broad range of populations, including depressed smokers. Our next step will be to conduct a pilot trial to assess acceptability and potential efficacy of the robotic-assisted exercise coaching intervention for smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0197090
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Robotics
exercise
Exercise
Technology
smoking (food products)
sampling
robots
Smoking Cessation
Robots
demographic statistics
Feedback
Smoking
Demography
Depression
Surveys and Questionnaires
Mentoring
socioeconomic status
Tablets
wheels
Scalability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Survey of potential receptivity to robotic-assisted exercise coaching in a diverse sample of smokers and nonsmokers. / Patten, Christi Ann; Levine, James A.; Pavlidis, Ioannis; Balls-Berry, Joyce; Shah, Arya; Hughes, Christine; Brockman, Tabetha; Soto, Miguel Valdez; Witt, Daniel; Koepp, Gabriel; Sinicrope, Pamela; Richards, Jamie.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 13, No. 5, e0197090, 01.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patten, CA, Levine, JA, Pavlidis, I, Balls-Berry, J, Shah, A, Hughes, C, Brockman, T, Soto, MV, Witt, D, Koepp, G, Sinicrope, P & Richards, J 2018, 'Survey of potential receptivity to robotic-assisted exercise coaching in a diverse sample of smokers and nonsmokers', PLoS One, vol. 13, no. 5, e0197090. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0197090
Patten, Christi Ann ; Levine, James A. ; Pavlidis, Ioannis ; Balls-Berry, Joyce ; Shah, Arya ; Hughes, Christine ; Brockman, Tabetha ; Soto, Miguel Valdez ; Witt, Daniel ; Koepp, Gabriel ; Sinicrope, Pamela ; Richards, Jamie. / Survey of potential receptivity to robotic-assisted exercise coaching in a diverse sample of smokers and nonsmokers. In: PLoS One. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 5.
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