Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement: evaluation of the effect of the size of the resection. Surgical technique.

Rodrigo M. Mardones, Carlos Gonzalez, Qingshan Chen, Mark Zobitz, Kenton R Kaufman, Robert T. Trousdale

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: In patients with symptomatic hip impingement, surgical resection of the femoral head-neck junction may improve the range of motion and relieve pain. A risk of this procedure is fracture. We evaluated the amount of resection of the anterolateral aspect of the femoral head-neck junction that can be done safely. METHODS: Cadaveric proximal femoral specimens (fifteen matched pairs) were divided into three groups: 10%, 30%, or 50% of the diameter of one femoral neck was removed, and the contralateral femoral neck was left intact to serve as the control. A compressive load was applied directly to the femoral head. Peak load, stiffness, and energy to fracture were compared among the groups. RESULTS: The energy to fracture differed significantly (p = 0.0015) among the 10%, 30%, and 50% resection groups. The peak load after the 50% resection was significantly less (p = 0.0025) than that after the 10% or 30% resection. With the numbers available, there was no significant difference in peak load between the 10% and 30% resections. CONCLUSIONS: Resection of up to 30% of the anterolateral quadrant of the head-neck junction did not significantly alter the load-bearing capacity of the proximal part of the femur. However, a 30% resection significantly decreased the amount of energy required to produce a fracture. Thirty percent should be considered to be the greatest feasible amount of resection because of the change in the pattern of the femoral head-neck response to axial loads that we observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)84-91
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume.
Volume88 Suppl 1 Pt 1
StatePublished - Mar 2006

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Femoracetabular Impingement
Femur Neck
Thigh
Therapeutics
Weight-Bearing
Articular Range of Motion
Femur
Hip
Neck
Head
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement : evaluation of the effect of the size of the resection. Surgical technique. / Mardones, Rodrigo M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Chen, Qingshan; Zobitz, Mark; Kaufman, Kenton R; Trousdale, Robert T.

In: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume., Vol. 88 Suppl 1 Pt 1, 03.2006, p. 84-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mardones, Rodrigo M. ; Gonzalez, Carlos ; Chen, Qingshan ; Zobitz, Mark ; Kaufman, Kenton R ; Trousdale, Robert T. / Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement : evaluation of the effect of the size of the resection. Surgical technique. In: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume. 2006 ; Vol. 88 Suppl 1 Pt 1. pp. 84-91.
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