Surgical Resection of Carotid Body Tumors: Long-Term Survival, Recurrence, and Metastasis

JOHN D. NORA, JOHN W. HALLETT, PETER C. O'BRIEN, JAMES M. NAESSENS, KENNETH J. CHERRY, PETER C. PAIROLERO

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67 Scopus citations

Abstract

We retrospectively reviewed a 20-year experience with 59 carotid body tumors in 55 patients examined at our institution in order to determine the long-term results of surgical resection, including the rates of distant metastasis, local recurrence, and long-term survival. Complete surgical excision was possible in 52 of the 55 patients (95%). Perioperative mortality was only 2% (1 of 59 procedures), and no operative deaths occurred during the last 10 years of the study. Survival of patients after resection of a carotid body tumor was equivalent to that for sex- and age-matched control subjects. Only one patient (2%) had development of metastatic disease during long-term follow-up. Three patients (6%) had recurrence of the carotid body tumor after complete excision. All recurrent tumors were observed in patients with multiple paragangliomas or a family history of cervical paragangliomas. Therefore, we advocate early surgical resection of all carotid body tumors in low-risk patients. Such early resection maximizes the possibility of cure and minimizes the risks of neurovascular complications associated with large and neglected tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-352
Number of pages5
JournalMayo Clinic proceedings
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    NORA, JOHN. D., HALLETT, JOHN. W., O'BRIEN, PETER. C., NAESSENS, JAMES. M., CHERRY, KENNETH. J., & PAIROLERO, PETER. C. (1988). Surgical Resection of Carotid Body Tumors: Long-Term Survival, Recurrence, and Metastasis. Mayo Clinic proceedings, 63(4), 348-352. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0025-6196(12)64856-3