Surgical resection of carotid body tumors: Long-term survival, recurrence, and metastasis

J. D. Nora, J. W. Hallett, P. C. O'Brien, James M Naessens, K. J. Cherry, P. C. Pairolero

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Abstract

We retrospectively reviewed a 20-year experience with 59 carotid body tumors in 55 patients examined at our institution in order to determine the long-term results of surgical resection, including the rates of distant metastasis, local recurrence, and long-term survival. Complete surgical excision was possible in 52 of the 55 patients (95%). Perioperative mortality was only 2% (1 of 59 procedures), and no operative deaths occurred during the last 10 years of the study. Survival of patients after resection of a carotid body tumor was equivalent to that for sex- and age-matched control subjects. Only one patient (2%) had development of metastatic disease during long-term follow-up. Three patients (6%) had recurrence of the carotid body tumor after complete excision. All recurrent tumors were observed in patients with multiple paragangliomas or a family history of cervical paragangliomas. Therefore, we advocate early surgical resection of all carotid body tumors in low-risk patients. Such early resection maximizes the possibility of cure and minimizes the risks of neurovascular complications associated with large and neglected tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-352
Number of pages5
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume63
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1988

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Carotid Body Tumor
Neoplasm Metastasis
Recurrence
Survival
Paraganglioma
Operative Surgical Procedures
Neoplasms
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nora, J. D., Hallett, J. W., O'Brien, P. C., Naessens, J. M., Cherry, K. J., & Pairolero, P. C. (1988). Surgical resection of carotid body tumors: Long-term survival, recurrence, and metastasis. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 63(4), 348-352.

Surgical resection of carotid body tumors : Long-term survival, recurrence, and metastasis. / Nora, J. D.; Hallett, J. W.; O'Brien, P. C.; Naessens, James M; Cherry, K. J.; Pairolero, P. C.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 63, No. 4, 1988, p. 348-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nora, JD, Hallett, JW, O'Brien, PC, Naessens, JM, Cherry, KJ & Pairolero, PC 1988, 'Surgical resection of carotid body tumors: Long-term survival, recurrence, and metastasis', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 63, no. 4, pp. 348-352.
Nora, J. D. ; Hallett, J. W. ; O'Brien, P. C. ; Naessens, James M ; Cherry, K. J. ; Pairolero, P. C. / Surgical resection of carotid body tumors : Long-term survival, recurrence, and metastasis. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1988 ; Vol. 63, No. 4. pp. 348-352.
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