Surgical issues in lung transplantation: Options, donor selection, graft preservation, and airway healing

Richard C. Daly, Christopher G A Mcgregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To present an overview of the surgical issues in lung transplantation, including the historical context and the rationale for choosing a particular procedure for a specific patient, we reviewed and summarized the current medical literature and our personal experience. Several surgical options are available, including single lung transplantation; double lung transplantation; heart-lung transplantation; bilateral, sequential single lung transplantation; and (recently) single lobe transplantation. Although single lung transplantation is preferred for maximal use of the available organs, bilateral lung transplantation is necessary for septic lung diseases and may be appropriate for pulmonary hypertension and bullous emphysema. Heart-lung transplantation is performed for Eisenmenger's syndrome and for primary pulmonary hypertension with severe right ventricular failure. General factors for consideration in assessment of compatibility of the donor and potential recipient include ABO blood group, height (the donor should be within ±20% of the recipient's height), and length of the lungs (determined on an anteroposterior chest roentgenogram). Graft preservation and minimal duration of ischemia are important. Complications associated with airway healing are related to ischemia of the donor bronchus. We have addressed the issue of donor bronchial ischemia by direct revascularization of the donor bronchial arteries with use of the recipient's internal thoracic artery. Currently, lung transplantation offers a realistic therapeutic option to patients with endstage pulmonary parenchymal or vascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-84
Number of pages6
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume72
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1997

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Donor Selection
Lung Transplantation
Transplants
Tissue Donors
Heart-Lung Transplantation
Ischemia
Lung Diseases
Eisenmenger Complex
Bronchial Arteries
Mammary Arteries
Emphysema
Bronchi
Blood Group Antigens
Vascular Diseases
Pulmonary Hypertension
Thorax
Transplantation
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Surgical issues in lung transplantation : Options, donor selection, graft preservation, and airway healing. / Daly, Richard C.; Mcgregor, Christopher G A.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 72, No. 1, 1997, p. 79-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Daly, Richard C. ; Mcgregor, Christopher G A. / Surgical issues in lung transplantation : Options, donor selection, graft preservation, and airway healing. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1997 ; Vol. 72, No. 1. pp. 79-84.
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