Suprachoroidal hemorrhage: Outcome of surgical management according to hemorrhage severity

William J. Wirostko, Dennis P. Han, William F. Mieler, Jose S. Pulido, Thomas B. Connor, Evelyn Kuhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To report the visual and anatomic outcome after surgical drainage of suprachoroidal hemorrhage according to hemorrhage severity. Design: A retrospective chart review. Participants: Forty-eight consecutive eyes undergoing surgical drainage of a suprachoroidal hemorrhage at The Medical College of Wisconsin were examined. Intervention: Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients, medical records. Eyes were classified into four categories of increasing hemorrhage complexity: (1) nonappositional choroidal hemorrhage without vitreous or retinal incarceration in the wound (12 eyes); (2) centrally appositional choroidal hemorrhage without vitreous or retinal incarceration in the wound (17 eyes); (3) choroidal hemorrhage with associated vitreous incarceration in the wound (11 eyes); and (4) choroidal hemorrhage with associated retinal incarceration in the wound (8 eyes). Main Outcome Measures: Visual acuity, rate of persistent hypotony, and incidence of irreparable retinal detachment after surgical drainage for four classes of suprachoroidal hemorrhage were defined. Results: Overall, 11 (23%) of 48 eyes had no light perception (NLP) vision develop, 9 (19%) of 48 eyes had persistent postsurgical hypotony (intraocular pressure < 6), and 21 (64%) of 33 eyes with retinal detachment enjoyed successful retinal reattachment surgery. A definite trend toward an increased rate of NLP vision (P < 0.02), persistent hypotony (P < 0.05), and irreparable retinal detachment (P = 0.11) was observed with increasing suprachoroidal hemorrhage complexity. Eyes with retinal incarceration, compared to eyes without retinal incarceration, had an increased rate of NLP vision (63% vs. 15%; P < 0.01), persistent postsurgical hypotony (50% vs. 13%; P < 0.05), and irreparable retinal detachment (50% vs. 20%; P = 0.07). Conclusions: Eyes requiring surgical drainage of a suprachoroidal hemorrhage have a guarded prognosis, with a poorer outcome associated with increasing hemorrhage complexity. A classification system incorporating choroidal apposition, and vitreous and retinal incarceration in the wound, provides a format for reporting and assessing the efficacy of management strategies in this condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2271-2275
Number of pages5
JournalOphthalmology
Volume105
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Suprachoroidal hemorrhage: Outcome of surgical management according to hemorrhage severity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this