Suppression of creatine kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer results in increased phosphoryl transfer by adenylate kinase in intact skeletal muscle

Petras P Dzeja, Robert J. Zeleznikar, Nelson D. Goldberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The kinetics of creatine kinase (CK) and adenylate kinase (AK) activities were monitored in intact diaphragm muscle by 18O phosphoryl oxygen exchange to assess whether these two phosphotransferases provide an interrelated function integral to high energy phosphoryl metabolism. This possibility was examined by quantitating the net rates of CK- and AK-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer in comparison to the total cellular ATP metabolic rate when CK activity in the intact diaphragm muscle was progressively inhibited by 2,4- dinitrofluorobenzene. In noncontracting muscle from untreated rats, net rates of CK- and AK-catalyzed phosphotransfer were equivalent to 88 and 7%, respectively, of the total ATP metabolic rate. These results were compared with reported 31P NMR analyses of total creatine phosphate flux to estimate that each creatine phosphate molecule produced undergoes about 50 unidirectional CK-catalyzed phosphotransfers in transit to an ATP consumption site in the intact muscles. Graded inhibition by 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene of intracellular CK activity by up to 98% resulted in a progressive shift in phosphotransferase catalysis from the CK to the AK system; the sum of the net rates of phosphoryl transfer by combining the increasing AK and decreasing CK activities continued to approximate the total cellular ATP metabolic rate. These results indicate that in diaphragm muscle CK and AK operate as interrelated cellular high energy phosphoryl transfer systems through which the majority of newly generated ATP is processed prior to its utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12847-12851
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume271
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Adenylate Kinase
Creatine Kinase
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Adenosine Triphosphate
Diaphragms
Diaphragm
Dinitrofluorobenzene
Muscles
Phosphocreatine
Phosphotransferases
MM Form Creatine Kinase
Energy Transfer
Catalysis
Energy transfer
Energy Metabolism
Rats
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Oxygen
Fluxes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

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Suppression of creatine kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer results in increased phosphoryl transfer by adenylate kinase in intact skeletal muscle. / Dzeja, Petras P; Zeleznikar, Robert J.; Goldberg, Nelson D.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 271, No. 22, 1996, p. 12847-12851.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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