Supporting Professionals in Critical Care Medicine: Burnout, Resiliency, and System-Level Change

Alexander S. Niven, Curtis N. Sessler

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Burnout is occurring in epidemic proportions among intensive care unit physicians and other health-care professionals-accelerated by pandemic-driven stress. The impact of burnout is far-reaching, threatening the health of individual workers, the safety and quality of care our patients receive, and eroding the infrastructure of health care in general. Drivers of burnout include excessive quantity of work (nights, weekends, and acuity surges); excessive menial tasks; incivility, poor communication, and challenges to team success; and frequent moral distress and end-of-life issues. This article provides system-based practice and individual strategies to address these drivers and improve the well-being of our team and our patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-577
Number of pages15
JournalClinics in Chest Medicine
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2022

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Critical care
  • ICU
  • Moral distress
  • Moral injury
  • Resilience
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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