Support Person Intervention to Promote Smoker Utilization of the QUITPLAN® Helpline

Christi Ann Patten, Christina M. Smith, Tabetha A. Brockman, Paul A. Decker, Kari J. Anderson, Christine A. Hughes, Pamela Sinicrope, Kenneth P. Offord, Edward Lichtenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Effective cessation services are greatly underutilized by smokers. Only about 1.5% of smokers in Minnesota utilize the state-funded QUITPLAN® Helpline. Substantial evidence exists on the role of social support in smoking cessation. In preparation for a large randomized trial, this study developed and piloted an intervention for an adult nonsmoking support person to motivate and encourage a smoker to call the QUITPLAN Helpline. Methods: The support person intervention was developed based on Cohen's theory of social support. It consisted of written materials and three consecutive, weekly, 20-30 minute telephone sessions. Smoker calls to the QUITPLAN Helpline were documented by intake staff. Results: Participants were 30 support people (93% women, 97% Caucasian, mean age 49). High rates of treatment compliance were observed, with 28 (93%) completing all three telephone sessions. The intervention was ranked as somewhat or very helpful by 77% of the support people, and 97% would definitely or probably recommend the program. Five smokers linked to a support person called the QUITPLAN Helpline. Conclusions: An intervention using natural support networks to promote smoker utilization of the QUITPLAN Helpline is both acceptable to a support person and feasible. A controlled randomized trial is under way to examine the efficacy of the intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume35
Issue number6 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

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Telephone
Social Support
Smoking Cessation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Patten, C. A., Smith, C. M., Brockman, T. A., Decker, P. A., Anderson, K. J., Hughes, C. A., ... Lichtenstein, E. (2008). Support Person Intervention to Promote Smoker Utilization of the QUITPLAN® Helpline. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35(6 SUPPL.). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2008.09.003

Support Person Intervention to Promote Smoker Utilization of the QUITPLAN® Helpline. / Patten, Christi Ann; Smith, Christina M.; Brockman, Tabetha A.; Decker, Paul A.; Anderson, Kari J.; Hughes, Christine A.; Sinicrope, Pamela; Offord, Kenneth P.; Lichtenstein, Edward.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 6 SUPPL., 12.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patten, CA, Smith, CM, Brockman, TA, Decker, PA, Anderson, KJ, Hughes, CA, Sinicrope, P, Offord, KP & Lichtenstein, E 2008, 'Support Person Intervention to Promote Smoker Utilization of the QUITPLAN® Helpline', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 35, no. 6 SUPPL.. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2008.09.003
Patten, Christi Ann ; Smith, Christina M. ; Brockman, Tabetha A. ; Decker, Paul A. ; Anderson, Kari J. ; Hughes, Christine A. ; Sinicrope, Pamela ; Offord, Kenneth P. ; Lichtenstein, Edward. / Support Person Intervention to Promote Smoker Utilization of the QUITPLAN® Helpline. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 35, No. 6 SUPPL.
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