Superficial soft-tissue masses: Analysis, diagnosis, and differential considerations

Francesca D. Beaman, Mark J. Kransdorf, Tricia R. Andrews, Mark D. Murphey, Lynn K. Arcara, James H. Keeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A wide variety of superficial soft-tissue masses may be seen in clinical practice, but a systematic approach can help achieve a definitive diagnosis or limit a differential diagnosis. Superficial soft-tissue masses can generally be categorized as mesenchymal tumors, skin appendage lesions, metastatic tumors, other tumors and tumorlike lesions, or inflammatory lesions. With regard to their imaging features, these masses may be further divided into lesions that arise in association with the epidermis or dermis (cutaneous lesions), lesions that arise within the substance of the subcutaneous adipose tissue, or lesions that arise in intimate association with the fascia overlying the muscle. The differential diagnosis may be limited further by considering the age of the patient, anatomic location of the lesion, salient imaging features, and clinical manifestations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-523
Number of pages15
JournalRadiographics
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

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Differential Diagnosis
Neoplasms
Skin
Subcutaneous Fat
Fascia
Dermis
Epidermis
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Beaman, F. D., Kransdorf, M. J., Andrews, T. R., Murphey, M. D., Arcara, L. K., & Keeling, J. H. (2007). Superficial soft-tissue masses: Analysis, diagnosis, and differential considerations. Radiographics, 27(2), 509-523. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.272065082

Superficial soft-tissue masses : Analysis, diagnosis, and differential considerations. / Beaman, Francesca D.; Kransdorf, Mark J.; Andrews, Tricia R.; Murphey, Mark D.; Arcara, Lynn K.; Keeling, James H.

In: Radiographics, Vol. 27, No. 2, 03.2007, p. 509-523.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beaman, FD, Kransdorf, MJ, Andrews, TR, Murphey, MD, Arcara, LK & Keeling, JH 2007, 'Superficial soft-tissue masses: Analysis, diagnosis, and differential considerations', Radiographics, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 509-523. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.272065082
Beaman FD, Kransdorf MJ, Andrews TR, Murphey MD, Arcara LK, Keeling JH. Superficial soft-tissue masses: Analysis, diagnosis, and differential considerations. Radiographics. 2007 Mar;27(2):509-523. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.272065082
Beaman, Francesca D. ; Kransdorf, Mark J. ; Andrews, Tricia R. ; Murphey, Mark D. ; Arcara, Lynn K. ; Keeling, James H. / Superficial soft-tissue masses : Analysis, diagnosis, and differential considerations. In: Radiographics. 2007 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 509-523.
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