Subject recruitment, retention and protocol feasibility in a prospective study of nutritional risk among urban, frail homebound elders

Carole V. Ewart, Nichole A. Fearon, Maureen E. Lund, Brett Martin, James L Kirkland, Christine S. Ritchie, Paula A. Quatromoni, Rebecca A. Silliman, Barbara E. Millen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The feasibility of performing comprehensive in-home nutritional risk assessments in a prospective research study of urban, frail homebound elderly patients (aged 65-105) is important, given prior reports of difficulties conducting research with older adults. Trained field teams conducted nutritional and health status assessments on 239 subjects, patients of the Boston University Geriatric Services clinical home care program. Baseline data were obtained on 153 of the 159 inter-view items from 91% of respondents; three 24 hour dietary recalls from 73%; anthropometry from 60-93%; and other physical assessments from 63-94%. Attrition was 21%, and mortality was 9% over 12 months. Well-designed, flexibly administered study protocols, modest financial incentives and careful follow-up contributed to follow-up interview re-sponse rates of 81 to 89% among enrollees over the study’s duration. Clearly, it is feasible to recruit frail, older subjects and for well-trained, two person field teams to conduct comprehensive in-home assessments of nutritional risk in under two hours with good retention over 12 months of follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Nutrition for the Elderly
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Frail Elderly
Nutrition Assessment
Prospective Studies
Anthropometry
Home Care Services
Nutritional Status
Research
Geriatrics
Health Status
Motivation
Interviews
Mortality
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Elder nutrition
  • Elders
  • Feasibility
  • In-home assessments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Subject recruitment, retention and protocol feasibility in a prospective study of nutritional risk among urban, frail homebound elders. / Ewart, Carole V.; Fearon, Nichole A.; Lund, Maureen E.; Martin, Brett; Kirkland, James L; Ritchie, Christine S.; Quatromoni, Paula A.; Silliman, Rebecca A.; Millen, Barbara E.

In: Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2001, p. 1-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ewart, Carole V. ; Fearon, Nichole A. ; Lund, Maureen E. ; Martin, Brett ; Kirkland, James L ; Ritchie, Christine S. ; Quatromoni, Paula A. ; Silliman, Rebecca A. ; Millen, Barbara E. / Subject recruitment, retention and protocol feasibility in a prospective study of nutritional risk among urban, frail homebound elders. In: Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly. 2001 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 1-21.
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