Stress level, health behaviors, and quality of life in employees joining a wellness center

Matthew M Clark, Beth A. Warren, Philip T. Hagen, Bruce David Johnson, Sarah M. Jenkins, Brooke L. Werneburg, Kerry D. Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. Examine the relationship between stress level and quality of life at a worksite wellness center. Design. A survey completed when joining the wellness center. Setting. Employee wellness center. Subjects. Survey that inquired about stress, health behaviors, and quality of life of more than 13,000 employees joining a wellness center. Measures. A series of questions about current health status and health behaviors. Analysis. Two-sample t-tests assuming unequal variances. Results. A total of 2147 of these employees reported having high stress levels. Employees with high stress levels had statistically significant lower quality of life, more fatigue, and poorer health compared with employees with low stress levels. In terms of their ability and motivation to participate in wellness programs, the high-stress employees were also less active and had less healthy nutritional habits, less support, and less confidence in their ability to be active. They also reported having more health problems, including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, and overweight. Conclusions. It appears that employees with high stress levels - those who might most benefit from participation in wellness programs - may experience the greatest difficulty participating actively in wellness programs because of their lack of support, low confidence, and numerous health problems. Perhaps offering tailored stress reduction programs for these employees would be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-25
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Fitness Centers
Health Behavior
health behavior
Health Status
quality of life
Health Promotion
Quality of Life
employee
Aptitude
Health
Workplace
Habits
Fatigue
Blood Glucose
Motivation
confidence
health
Cholesterol
Hypertension
ability

Keywords

  • Health Behavior
  • Prevention Research
  • Psychologic Stress
  • Quality of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Stress level, health behaviors, and quality of life in employees joining a wellness center. / Clark, Matthew M; Warren, Beth A.; Hagen, Philip T.; Johnson, Bruce David; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Werneburg, Brooke L.; Olsen, Kerry D.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 26, No. 1, 09.2011, p. 21-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clark, Matthew M ; Warren, Beth A. ; Hagen, Philip T. ; Johnson, Bruce David ; Jenkins, Sarah M. ; Werneburg, Brooke L. ; Olsen, Kerry D. / Stress level, health behaviors, and quality of life in employees joining a wellness center. In: American Journal of Health Promotion. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 21-25.
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