Stimulation of lipolysis in humans by physiological hypercortisolemia

Gavin D. Divertie, Michael Dennis Jensen, John M. Miles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of glucocorticoids on adipose tissue lipolysis in animals and humans is controversial. To determine whether a physiological increase in plasma cortisol, similar to that observed in diabetic ketoacidosis and other stress conditions, stimulates lipolysis, palmitate kinetics were measured in seven nondiabetic volunteers on two occasions with [1-14C]palmitate as a tracer. Subjects received a 6-h infusion of either 2 μg · kg-1 · min-1 hydrocortisone or saline in random order. On both occasions, a pancreatic clamp (0.12 μg · kg-1 · min-1 somatostatin, 0.05 mU · kg-1 · min-1 insulin, and 3 ng kg-1 · min-1 growth hormone) was used to maintain plasma hormone concentrations at desired levels. Plasma cortisol concentrations increased to ∼970 nM during cortisol infusion. Palmitate rate of appearance (Ra) and concentration increased by ∼60% during cortisol infusion but did not change during saline infusion. Increments in palmitate Ra and concentration over the 6-h study were significantly greater during cortisol than saline infusion when compared by area-under-the-curve analysis (152 ± 52 vs. -48 ± 23 μmol · kg-1 and 12.2 ± 4.1 vs. -4.9 ± 4.1 mmol · min-1 · L-1, respectively; P < 0.02). Plasma glucose concentrations did not change significantly during cortisol (5.0 ± 0.3 vs. 6.1 ± 0.6 mM, NS) or saline (4.9 ± 0.2 vs. 4.9 ± 0.1 mM, NS) infusion. In nondiabetic volunteers, a 6-h cortisol infusion was associated with a 60% increase in palmitate Ra that did not occur with saline infusion. Thus, physiological hypercortisolemia may contribute to the increased rates of lipolysis observed in humans during stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1228-1232
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes
Volume40
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1991

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Lipolysis
Hydrocortisone
Palmitates
Volunteers
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Somatostatin
Glucocorticoids
Growth Hormone
Area Under Curve
Adipose Tissue
Hormones
Insulin
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Divertie, G. D., Jensen, M. D., & Miles, J. M. (1991). Stimulation of lipolysis in humans by physiological hypercortisolemia. Diabetes, 40(10), 1228-1232.

Stimulation of lipolysis in humans by physiological hypercortisolemia. / Divertie, Gavin D.; Jensen, Michael Dennis; Miles, John M.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 40, No. 10, 10.1991, p. 1228-1232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Divertie, GD, Jensen, MD & Miles, JM 1991, 'Stimulation of lipolysis in humans by physiological hypercortisolemia', Diabetes, vol. 40, no. 10, pp. 1228-1232.
Divertie, Gavin D. ; Jensen, Michael Dennis ; Miles, John M. / Stimulation of lipolysis in humans by physiological hypercortisolemia. In: Diabetes. 1991 ; Vol. 40, No. 10. pp. 1228-1232.
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