Stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of oligometastatic prostate cancer

Kamran A. Ahmed, Brandon M. Barney, Brian J. Davis, Sean S Park, Eugene D Kwon, Kenneth R. Olivier

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Abstract

Purpose/objective(s): To report outcomes and toxicity for patients with oligometastatic (≤5 lesions) prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials/methods: Seventeen men with 21 PCa lesions were treated with SBRT between February 2009 and November 2011. All patients had a detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at the time of SBRT, and 11 patients (65%) had hormone-refractory (HR) disease. Treatment sites included bone (n = 19), lymph nodes (n = 1), and liver (n = 1). For patients with bone lesions, the median dose was 20 Gy (range, 8-24 Gy) in a single fraction (range, 1-3). All but two patients received some form of anti-androgen therapy after completing SBRT. Results: Local control (LC) was 100%, and the PSA nadir was undetectable in nine patients (53%). The first post-SBRT PSA was lower than pre-treatment levels in 15 patients (88%), and continued to decline or remain undetectable in 12 patients (71%) at a median follow-up of 6 months (range, 2-24 months). Median PSA measurements before SBRT and at last follow-up were 2.1 ng/dl (range, 0.13-36.4) and 0.17 ng/dl (range, <0.1-140), respectively. Six (55%) of the 11 patients with HR PCa achieved either undetectable or declining PSA at a median follow-up of 4.8 months (range, 2.2-6.0 months). Reported toxicities included one case each of grade 2 dyspnea and back pain, there were no cases of grade ≥3 toxicity following treatment. Conclusion: We report excellent LC with SBRT in oligometastatic PCa. More importantly, over half the patients achieved an undetectable PSA after SBRT. Further follow-up is necessary to assess the long-term impact of SBRT on LC, toxicity, PSA response, and clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberArticle 215
JournalFrontiers in Oncology
Volume2 JAN
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Therapeutics
Hormones
Bone and Bones
Back Pain
Dyspnea
Androgens
Lymph Nodes
Liver

Keywords

  • Bone metastases
  • Intensity-modulated radiation therapy
  • Prostate metastases
  • Prostate-specific antigen
  • Stereotactic body radiation therapy
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of oligometastatic prostate cancer. / Ahmed, Kamran A.; Barney, Brandon M.; Davis, Brian J.; Park, Sean S; Kwon, Eugene D; Olivier, Kenneth R.

In: Frontiers in Oncology, Vol. 2 JAN, Article 215, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahmed, Kamran A. ; Barney, Brandon M. ; Davis, Brian J. ; Park, Sean S ; Kwon, Eugene D ; Olivier, Kenneth R. / Stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of oligometastatic prostate cancer. In: Frontiers in Oncology. 2013 ; Vol. 2 JAN.
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abstract = "Purpose/objective(s): To report outcomes and toxicity for patients with oligometastatic (≤5 lesions) prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials/methods: Seventeen men with 21 PCa lesions were treated with SBRT between February 2009 and November 2011. All patients had a detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at the time of SBRT, and 11 patients (65{\%}) had hormone-refractory (HR) disease. Treatment sites included bone (n = 19), lymph nodes (n = 1), and liver (n = 1). For patients with bone lesions, the median dose was 20 Gy (range, 8-24 Gy) in a single fraction (range, 1-3). All but two patients received some form of anti-androgen therapy after completing SBRT. Results: Local control (LC) was 100{\%}, and the PSA nadir was undetectable in nine patients (53{\%}). The first post-SBRT PSA was lower than pre-treatment levels in 15 patients (88{\%}), and continued to decline or remain undetectable in 12 patients (71{\%}) at a median follow-up of 6 months (range, 2-24 months). Median PSA measurements before SBRT and at last follow-up were 2.1 ng/dl (range, 0.13-36.4) and 0.17 ng/dl (range, <0.1-140), respectively. Six (55{\%}) of the 11 patients with HR PCa achieved either undetectable or declining PSA at a median follow-up of 4.8 months (range, 2.2-6.0 months). Reported toxicities included one case each of grade 2 dyspnea and back pain, there were no cases of grade ≥3 toxicity following treatment. Conclusion: We report excellent LC with SBRT in oligometastatic PCa. More importantly, over half the patients achieved an undetectable PSA after SBRT. Further follow-up is necessary to assess the long-term impact of SBRT on LC, toxicity, PSA response, and clinical outcomes.",
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AU - Ahmed, Kamran A.

AU - Barney, Brandon M.

AU - Davis, Brian J.

AU - Park, Sean S

AU - Kwon, Eugene D

AU - Olivier, Kenneth R.

PY - 2013

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N2 - Purpose/objective(s): To report outcomes and toxicity for patients with oligometastatic (≤5 lesions) prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials/methods: Seventeen men with 21 PCa lesions were treated with SBRT between February 2009 and November 2011. All patients had a detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at the time of SBRT, and 11 patients (65%) had hormone-refractory (HR) disease. Treatment sites included bone (n = 19), lymph nodes (n = 1), and liver (n = 1). For patients with bone lesions, the median dose was 20 Gy (range, 8-24 Gy) in a single fraction (range, 1-3). All but two patients received some form of anti-androgen therapy after completing SBRT. Results: Local control (LC) was 100%, and the PSA nadir was undetectable in nine patients (53%). The first post-SBRT PSA was lower than pre-treatment levels in 15 patients (88%), and continued to decline or remain undetectable in 12 patients (71%) at a median follow-up of 6 months (range, 2-24 months). Median PSA measurements before SBRT and at last follow-up were 2.1 ng/dl (range, 0.13-36.4) and 0.17 ng/dl (range, <0.1-140), respectively. Six (55%) of the 11 patients with HR PCa achieved either undetectable or declining PSA at a median follow-up of 4.8 months (range, 2.2-6.0 months). Reported toxicities included one case each of grade 2 dyspnea and back pain, there were no cases of grade ≥3 toxicity following treatment. Conclusion: We report excellent LC with SBRT in oligometastatic PCa. More importantly, over half the patients achieved an undetectable PSA after SBRT. Further follow-up is necessary to assess the long-term impact of SBRT on LC, toxicity, PSA response, and clinical outcomes.

AB - Purpose/objective(s): To report outcomes and toxicity for patients with oligometastatic (≤5 lesions) prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials/methods: Seventeen men with 21 PCa lesions were treated with SBRT between February 2009 and November 2011. All patients had a detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at the time of SBRT, and 11 patients (65%) had hormone-refractory (HR) disease. Treatment sites included bone (n = 19), lymph nodes (n = 1), and liver (n = 1). For patients with bone lesions, the median dose was 20 Gy (range, 8-24 Gy) in a single fraction (range, 1-3). All but two patients received some form of anti-androgen therapy after completing SBRT. Results: Local control (LC) was 100%, and the PSA nadir was undetectable in nine patients (53%). The first post-SBRT PSA was lower than pre-treatment levels in 15 patients (88%), and continued to decline or remain undetectable in 12 patients (71%) at a median follow-up of 6 months (range, 2-24 months). Median PSA measurements before SBRT and at last follow-up were 2.1 ng/dl (range, 0.13-36.4) and 0.17 ng/dl (range, <0.1-140), respectively. Six (55%) of the 11 patients with HR PCa achieved either undetectable or declining PSA at a median follow-up of 4.8 months (range, 2.2-6.0 months). Reported toxicities included one case each of grade 2 dyspnea and back pain, there were no cases of grade ≥3 toxicity following treatment. Conclusion: We report excellent LC with SBRT in oligometastatic PCa. More importantly, over half the patients achieved an undetectable PSA after SBRT. Further follow-up is necessary to assess the long-term impact of SBRT on LC, toxicity, PSA response, and clinical outcomes.

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KW - Intensity-modulated radiation therapy

KW - Prostate metastases

KW - Prostate-specific antigen

KW - Stereotactic body radiation therapy

KW - Stereotactic radiosurgery

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