Stability of pH gradients in vivo across the stomach in Helicobacter pylori gastritis, dyspepsia, and health

N. J. Talley, J. E. Ormand, C. A. Frie, A. R. Zinsmeister

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A layer of water-insoluble mucus gel is secreted by the gastric epithelium, and is believed to form an important barrier to acid injury. It is postulated that Helicobacter pylori can alter pH gradients by damaging the mucus layer, but no data on pH gradients in vivo in patients with H. pylori gastritis have been published. We aimed to construct a map of mucus- bicarbonate layer pH gradients in health and disease. Fourteen healthy asymptomatic volunteers (mean age, 46 yr) and 14 symptomatic patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) (mean age, 46 yr) were studied. A flexible pH microelectrode was passed through the biopsy channel of an endoscope; luminal readings and three mucosal surface pH readings were obtained from each of five specific gastric sites (fundus greater curve, body greater curve, antrum greater curve, antrum lesser curve, and antrum anterior wall) using standardized methodology. Gradients at each site were calculated (mean juxta mucosal pH minus luminal pH); pH electrode accuracy was tested in standard buffer solutions. Biopsies were obtained from each site to assess for H. pylori status. Among asymptomatic volunteers, 21% had H. pylori; in NUD, 50% were infected. There was a significant association between H. pylori and histological gastritis at each site. The overall mean (± SE) pH gradients in H. pylori-positive and -negative cases were similar, being 5.35 (± 0.06) and 5.26 (± 0.07), respectively. There was also no significant correlation between the histological gastritis score and the pH gradient at each gastric site. The pH gradients in healthy subjects (mean 5.31) and NUD (mean 5.29) were not significantly different. We conclude that pH gradients appear to remain stable throughout the stomach in healthy subjects and NUD, independent of H. pylori gastritis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)590-594
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume87
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Proton-Motive Force
Dyspepsia
Gastritis
Helicobacter pylori
Stomach
Health
Mucus
Healthy Volunteers
Reading
Gastric Fundus
Biopsy
Endoscopes
Microelectrodes
Bicarbonates
Volunteers
Buffers
Electrodes
Epithelium
Gels
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Stability of pH gradients in vivo across the stomach in Helicobacter pylori gastritis, dyspepsia, and health. / Talley, N. J.; Ormand, J. E.; Frie, C. A.; Zinsmeister, A. R.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 87, No. 5, 1992, p. 590-594.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talley, N. J. ; Ormand, J. E. ; Frie, C. A. ; Zinsmeister, A. R. / Stability of pH gradients in vivo across the stomach in Helicobacter pylori gastritis, dyspepsia, and health. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 1992 ; Vol. 87, No. 5. pp. 590-594.
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