Spontaneous hepatic hemorrhage: A single institution's 16-year experience

Armando Rosales, Florencia Que

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spontaneous hemorrhage from hepatic tumors is an uncommon but serious complication. Recently, interventional radiologic (IR) techniques are being used increasingly in the management of these patients. We report our 16-year experience in managing spontaneous hemorrhage from liver tumors. Twenty-six consecutive patients were diagnosed with spontaneous liver hemorrhage between 1995 and 2011. Initial management was operative in eight, IR in six, and supportive in 12 patients. Of those managed operatively, five were segmentectomies; one hemihepatectomy; one wedge resection; and one packing who later died from coagulopathy. In the IR patients, seven had an angiographic embolization; two required reembolization; one underwent resection of a hepatic adenoma 21 days after angiographic embolization. The malignant lesions included hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 6), angiosarcoma (n = 1), metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (n = 1), metastatic leiomyosarcoma (n = 1), nonsquamous cell carcinoma (n = 1), or metastatic angiosarcoma (n = 1). Benign diseases included hepatic adenoma (n = 5), end-stage liver disease (n = 1), and polycystic liver (n = 1). Spontaneous hemorrhage from the liver occurs evenly from benign or malignant causes, one-third of which are primary liver disease. If the patients presents emergently, angiographic embolization may control the bleeding and allow for elective resection once the sequelae of bleeding have resolved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1117-1120
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume82
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Hemorrhage
Liver
Hemangiosarcoma
Adenoma
End Stage Liver Disease
Segmental Mastectomy
Leiomyosarcoma
Liver Diseases
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Spontaneous hepatic hemorrhage : A single institution's 16-year experience. / Rosales, Armando; Que, Florencia.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 82, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 1117-1120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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