Spontaneous and induced remyelination in multiple sclerosis and the theiler's virus model of central nervous system demyelination

David J. Miller, Moses Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Remyelination in the central nervous system, originally thought to occur rarely, if ever, is now an established phenomena in multiple sclerosis patients. However, the extent of myelin repair is incomplete and limited. Experimental models of central nervous system demyelination provide an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular events involved in remyelination. These models may provide some clue to why remyelination in multiple sclerosis is incomplete as well as suggest potential methods to stimulate central nervous system repair. In this review we examine the morphological aspects of central nervous system remyelination and discuss both spontaneous and induced remyelination in multiple sclerosis and experimental models of central nervous system demyelination. We give special emphasis to the Theiler's virus model of central nervous system demyelination and its usefulness to identify therapeutic agents to promote remyelination. The role of immunoglobulins in promoting remyelination in both the Theiler's model system and in multiple sclerosis is discussed. Finally, we examine the potential physiological role of demyelination and remyelination and its relationship with clinical manifestations of central nervous system disease. © 1995 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-245
Number of pages16
JournalMicroscopy Research and Technique
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 1995

Keywords

  • Immunoglobulin
  • Myelin
  • Oligodendrocyte
  • Picornavirus
  • Schwann cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Histology
  • Instrumentation
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

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