Spinal Cord Stimulator Explantation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

A Case Series

Susan M. Moeschler, Rebecca A. Sanders, W. Michael Hooten, Bryan C. Hoelzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Spinal cord stimulator (SCS) systems are implanted to treat pain conditions such as neuropathic, radicular, and ischemic pain syndromes. Prior to July 2013, SCS systems were not magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible due to the risk of thermal injury at the site of the leads and generator. Although there are some case reports of patients undergoing MRI studies with SCS systems in place, these stimulators are frequently explanted when clinical care has necessitated an MRI. The purpose of this case series is to discuss the role of SCS explantation in order to acquire an MRI. Methods This study was performed at a tertiary academic pain medicine clinic. After exempt status was obtained via the institutional review board, patients were identified via the use of Common Procedural Terminology codes for implantable devices. A chart review was performed to identify all patients >18 years of age who had a lumbar or thoracic dorsal column SCS implanted during January 2001-December 2011. The charts were then followed to identify any patients who underwent a surgery for explantation of the device. Data collection included the total number of patients undergoing permanent SCS implantation, the total number of explantation of these devices, patient demographic factors, indication for SCS implantation, incidence of revisions and the indication, duration between implantation and explant of the device, and indication for explantation. Results During the time between 2001 and 2011, 199 patients were identified who underwent a thoracic or lumbar SCS implant after a successful trial. Among 199 implants, 33 devices were explanted, and of these, four were explanted due to the primary need for an MRI scan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-288
Number of pages4
JournalNeuromodulation
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Equipment and Supplies
Thorax
Pain Clinics
Pain
Research Ethics Committees
Terminology
Hot Temperature
Medicine
Demography
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Case series
  • contraindications
  • MRI
  • spinal cord stimulation
  • stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Moeschler, S. M., Sanders, R. A., Hooten, W. M., & Hoelzer, B. C. (2015). Spinal Cord Stimulator Explantation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case Series. Neuromodulation, 18(4), 285-288. https://doi.org/10.1111/ner.12254

Spinal Cord Stimulator Explantation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging : A Case Series. / Moeschler, Susan M.; Sanders, Rebecca A.; Hooten, W. Michael; Hoelzer, Bryan C.

In: Neuromodulation, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.06.2015, p. 285-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moeschler, SM, Sanders, RA, Hooten, WM & Hoelzer, BC 2015, 'Spinal Cord Stimulator Explantation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case Series', Neuromodulation, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 285-288. https://doi.org/10.1111/ner.12254
Moeschler, Susan M. ; Sanders, Rebecca A. ; Hooten, W. Michael ; Hoelzer, Bryan C. / Spinal Cord Stimulator Explantation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging : A Case Series. In: Neuromodulation. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 285-288.
@article{fd2d2d5392414608ba4780bd58ea4484,
title = "Spinal Cord Stimulator Explantation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case Series",
abstract = "Introduction Spinal cord stimulator (SCS) systems are implanted to treat pain conditions such as neuropathic, radicular, and ischemic pain syndromes. Prior to July 2013, SCS systems were not magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible due to the risk of thermal injury at the site of the leads and generator. Although there are some case reports of patients undergoing MRI studies with SCS systems in place, these stimulators are frequently explanted when clinical care has necessitated an MRI. The purpose of this case series is to discuss the role of SCS explantation in order to acquire an MRI. Methods This study was performed at a tertiary academic pain medicine clinic. After exempt status was obtained via the institutional review board, patients were identified via the use of Common Procedural Terminology codes for implantable devices. A chart review was performed to identify all patients >18 years of age who had a lumbar or thoracic dorsal column SCS implanted during January 2001-December 2011. The charts were then followed to identify any patients who underwent a surgery for explantation of the device. Data collection included the total number of patients undergoing permanent SCS implantation, the total number of explantation of these devices, patient demographic factors, indication for SCS implantation, incidence of revisions and the indication, duration between implantation and explant of the device, and indication for explantation. Results During the time between 2001 and 2011, 199 patients were identified who underwent a thoracic or lumbar SCS implant after a successful trial. Among 199 implants, 33 devices were explanted, and of these, four were explanted due to the primary need for an MRI scan.",
keywords = "Case series, contraindications, MRI, spinal cord stimulation, stimulation",
author = "Moeschler, {Susan M.} and Sanders, {Rebecca A.} and Hooten, {W. Michael} and Hoelzer, {Bryan C.}",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ner.12254",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "285--288",
journal = "Neuromodulation",
issn = "1094-7159",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spinal Cord Stimulator Explantation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

T2 - A Case Series

AU - Moeschler, Susan M.

AU - Sanders, Rebecca A.

AU - Hooten, W. Michael

AU - Hoelzer, Bryan C.

PY - 2015/6/1

Y1 - 2015/6/1

N2 - Introduction Spinal cord stimulator (SCS) systems are implanted to treat pain conditions such as neuropathic, radicular, and ischemic pain syndromes. Prior to July 2013, SCS systems were not magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible due to the risk of thermal injury at the site of the leads and generator. Although there are some case reports of patients undergoing MRI studies with SCS systems in place, these stimulators are frequently explanted when clinical care has necessitated an MRI. The purpose of this case series is to discuss the role of SCS explantation in order to acquire an MRI. Methods This study was performed at a tertiary academic pain medicine clinic. After exempt status was obtained via the institutional review board, patients were identified via the use of Common Procedural Terminology codes for implantable devices. A chart review was performed to identify all patients >18 years of age who had a lumbar or thoracic dorsal column SCS implanted during January 2001-December 2011. The charts were then followed to identify any patients who underwent a surgery for explantation of the device. Data collection included the total number of patients undergoing permanent SCS implantation, the total number of explantation of these devices, patient demographic factors, indication for SCS implantation, incidence of revisions and the indication, duration between implantation and explant of the device, and indication for explantation. Results During the time between 2001 and 2011, 199 patients were identified who underwent a thoracic or lumbar SCS implant after a successful trial. Among 199 implants, 33 devices were explanted, and of these, four were explanted due to the primary need for an MRI scan.

AB - Introduction Spinal cord stimulator (SCS) systems are implanted to treat pain conditions such as neuropathic, radicular, and ischemic pain syndromes. Prior to July 2013, SCS systems were not magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible due to the risk of thermal injury at the site of the leads and generator. Although there are some case reports of patients undergoing MRI studies with SCS systems in place, these stimulators are frequently explanted when clinical care has necessitated an MRI. The purpose of this case series is to discuss the role of SCS explantation in order to acquire an MRI. Methods This study was performed at a tertiary academic pain medicine clinic. After exempt status was obtained via the institutional review board, patients were identified via the use of Common Procedural Terminology codes for implantable devices. A chart review was performed to identify all patients >18 years of age who had a lumbar or thoracic dorsal column SCS implanted during January 2001-December 2011. The charts were then followed to identify any patients who underwent a surgery for explantation of the device. Data collection included the total number of patients undergoing permanent SCS implantation, the total number of explantation of these devices, patient demographic factors, indication for SCS implantation, incidence of revisions and the indication, duration between implantation and explant of the device, and indication for explantation. Results During the time between 2001 and 2011, 199 patients were identified who underwent a thoracic or lumbar SCS implant after a successful trial. Among 199 implants, 33 devices were explanted, and of these, four were explanted due to the primary need for an MRI scan.

KW - Case series

KW - contraindications

KW - MRI

KW - spinal cord stimulation

KW - stimulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930238831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930238831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ner.12254

DO - 10.1111/ner.12254

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 285

EP - 288

JO - Neuromodulation

JF - Neuromodulation

SN - 1094-7159

IS - 4

ER -