Sphingolipids as prognostic biomarkers of neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, and psychiatric diseases and their emerging role in lipidomic investigation methods

Daan van Kruining, Qian Luo, Gerhild van Echten-Deckert, Michelle M. Mielke, Andrew Bowman, Shane Ellis, Tiago Gil Oliveira, Pilar Martinez-Martinez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lipids play an important role in neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, and psychiatric disorders and an imbalance in sphingolipid levels is associated with disease. Although early diagnosis and intervention of these disorders would clearly have favorable long-term outcomes, no diagnostic tests currently exist that can accurately identify people at risk. Reliable prognostic biomarkers that are easily accessible would be beneficial to determine therapy and treatment response in clinical trials. Recent advances in lipidomic investigation methods have greatly progressed the knowledge of sphingolipids in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders over the past decades although more longitudinal studies are needed to understand its exact role in these disorders to be used as potential tools in the clinic. In this review, we give an overview of the current knowledge of sphingolipids in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders and explore recent advances in investigation methods. Finally, the potential of sphingolipid metabolism products and signaling molecules as potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognostic, or surrogate markers of treatment response is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-244
Number of pages13
JournalAdvanced Drug Delivery Reviews
Volume159
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Lipidomics
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Neuroinflammation
  • Psychiatric diseases
  • Sphingolipids
  • Surrogate markers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

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