Spherical navigator echoes for full 3-D rigid body motion measurement in MRI

Edward Brian Welch, Armando Manduca, Roger C. Grimm, Heidi A. Ward, Clifford R. Jack

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

A 3-D spherical navigator (SNAV) echo technique for MRI that can measure rigid body motion in all six degrees of freedom simultaneously by sampling a spherical shell in k-space is under development. Rigid body 3-D rotations of an imaged object simply rotate the k-space data, while translations alter phase in a known way. A computer controlled motion phantom was used to execute known rotations and translations to evaluate the technique. Accurate detection was possible with a double SNAV echo acquisition following a 3-D helical spiral trajectory. Motion detection for retrospective or prospective correction in MRI with spherical navigator echoes is thus feasible and practical.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention - MICCAI 2001 - 4th International Conference, Proceedings
EditorsWiro J. Niessen, Max A. Viergever
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages1235-1236
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)3540426973, 9783540454687
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Event4th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2001 - Utrecht, Netherlands
Duration: Oct 14 2001Oct 17 2001

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume2208
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other4th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2001
CountryNetherlands
CityUtrecht
Period10/14/0110/17/01

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

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