Sphere-linked immunodiagnostic assay (SLIDA): An electron microscopic method for detecting specific antibodies

V. Hari, D. Baunoch, P. Das

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have developed a sensitive method, sphere-linked immunodiagnostic assay, using specific antigens covalently bonded to microspheres for the detection of antibodies in serum. In this method, specific antigens, such as the capsid proteins of tobacco mosaic virus and tobacco etch virus, were independently, covalently bonded to plastic microspheres of 0.5 μm or 0.9 μm in diameter. The antigen-linked spheres were then exposed to normal serum or serum containing specific antibody, followed by treatment with gold-labeled secondary antibodies. The binding of the gold-labeled secondary antibodies to the specific primary antibodies on the spheres acted as an indication of the presence of the specific primary antibodies. The spheres were then examined and photographed by transmission electron microscopy. The number of gold particles bound to the spheres was counted manually using the photographs. The gold labelling was found to be specific and sensitive, enabling detection of antibodies present in highly diluted antisera. The efficiency and sensitivity of the technique for detection of antibodies were compared with those of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found to be highly sensitive. The technique was also used for testing for the presence of antibodies to herpes simplex virus as well as antibodies to Staphylococcus enterotoxin using microspheres coated with the respective antigens. We believe that this technique could be applied clinically when needed for detection of antibodies to other viruses, such as the Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-350
Number of pages9
JournalBioTechniques
Volume9
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Assays
Electrons
Antibodies
Viruses
Gold
Microspheres
Antigens
Tobacco
Serum
Tobacco Mosaic Virus
Immunosorbents
Enterotoxins
Capsid Proteins
Simplexvirus
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Staphylococcus
Labeling
Plastics
Immune Sera
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Sphere-linked immunodiagnostic assay (SLIDA) : An electron microscopic method for detecting specific antibodies. / Hari, V.; Baunoch, D.; Das, P.

In: BioTechniques, Vol. 9, No. 3, 1990, p. 342-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ccb4e75a720b429a9aa11ea9b120bd2a,
title = "Sphere-linked immunodiagnostic assay (SLIDA): An electron microscopic method for detecting specific antibodies",
abstract = "We have developed a sensitive method, sphere-linked immunodiagnostic assay, using specific antigens covalently bonded to microspheres for the detection of antibodies in serum. In this method, specific antigens, such as the capsid proteins of tobacco mosaic virus and tobacco etch virus, were independently, covalently bonded to plastic microspheres of 0.5 μm or 0.9 μm in diameter. The antigen-linked spheres were then exposed to normal serum or serum containing specific antibody, followed by treatment with gold-labeled secondary antibodies. The binding of the gold-labeled secondary antibodies to the specific primary antibodies on the spheres acted as an indication of the presence of the specific primary antibodies. The spheres were then examined and photographed by transmission electron microscopy. The number of gold particles bound to the spheres was counted manually using the photographs. The gold labelling was found to be specific and sensitive, enabling detection of antibodies present in highly diluted antisera. The efficiency and sensitivity of the technique for detection of antibodies were compared with those of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found to be highly sensitive. The technique was also used for testing for the presence of antibodies to herpes simplex virus as well as antibodies to Staphylococcus enterotoxin using microspheres coated with the respective antigens. We believe that this technique could be applied clinically when needed for detection of antibodies to other viruses, such as the Human Immunodeficiency Virus.",
author = "V. Hari and D. Baunoch and P. Das",
year = "1990",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "342--350",
journal = "BioTechniques",
issn = "0736-6205",
publisher = "Eaton Publishing Company",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sphere-linked immunodiagnostic assay (SLIDA)

T2 - An electron microscopic method for detecting specific antibodies

AU - Hari, V.

AU - Baunoch, D.

AU - Das, P.

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - We have developed a sensitive method, sphere-linked immunodiagnostic assay, using specific antigens covalently bonded to microspheres for the detection of antibodies in serum. In this method, specific antigens, such as the capsid proteins of tobacco mosaic virus and tobacco etch virus, were independently, covalently bonded to plastic microspheres of 0.5 μm or 0.9 μm in diameter. The antigen-linked spheres were then exposed to normal serum or serum containing specific antibody, followed by treatment with gold-labeled secondary antibodies. The binding of the gold-labeled secondary antibodies to the specific primary antibodies on the spheres acted as an indication of the presence of the specific primary antibodies. The spheres were then examined and photographed by transmission electron microscopy. The number of gold particles bound to the spheres was counted manually using the photographs. The gold labelling was found to be specific and sensitive, enabling detection of antibodies present in highly diluted antisera. The efficiency and sensitivity of the technique for detection of antibodies were compared with those of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found to be highly sensitive. The technique was also used for testing for the presence of antibodies to herpes simplex virus as well as antibodies to Staphylococcus enterotoxin using microspheres coated with the respective antigens. We believe that this technique could be applied clinically when needed for detection of antibodies to other viruses, such as the Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

AB - We have developed a sensitive method, sphere-linked immunodiagnostic assay, using specific antigens covalently bonded to microspheres for the detection of antibodies in serum. In this method, specific antigens, such as the capsid proteins of tobacco mosaic virus and tobacco etch virus, were independently, covalently bonded to plastic microspheres of 0.5 μm or 0.9 μm in diameter. The antigen-linked spheres were then exposed to normal serum or serum containing specific antibody, followed by treatment with gold-labeled secondary antibodies. The binding of the gold-labeled secondary antibodies to the specific primary antibodies on the spheres acted as an indication of the presence of the specific primary antibodies. The spheres were then examined and photographed by transmission electron microscopy. The number of gold particles bound to the spheres was counted manually using the photographs. The gold labelling was found to be specific and sensitive, enabling detection of antibodies present in highly diluted antisera. The efficiency and sensitivity of the technique for detection of antibodies were compared with those of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found to be highly sensitive. The technique was also used for testing for the presence of antibodies to herpes simplex virus as well as antibodies to Staphylococcus enterotoxin using microspheres coated with the respective antigens. We believe that this technique could be applied clinically when needed for detection of antibodies to other viruses, such as the Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025181106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025181106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2223076

AN - SCOPUS:0025181106

VL - 9

SP - 342

EP - 350

JO - BioTechniques

JF - BioTechniques

SN - 0736-6205

IS - 3

ER -