Spectrum of reoperations after repair of aortic coarctation: Importance of an individualized approach because of coexistent cardiovascular disease

Christine H. Attenhofer Jost, Hartzell V Schaff, Heidi M. Connolly, Gordon K. Danielson, Joseph A. Dearani, Francisco J. Puga, Carole A. Warnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the indications for and spectrum of late reoperations in adults who had previously undergone coarctation repair. Patients and Methods: We reviewed clinical, cardiac catheterization, and echocardiographic data and criteria for reoperation, surgical procedures, and outcome in 43 patients who underwent 54 reoperations between 1972 and 1996. Results: Of the reoperations for recoarctation or associated cardiovascular disease (or both), 20% were performed in asymptomatic patients and 80% in symptomatic patients. Associated cardiovascular disease included bicuspid aortic valve in 36 patients (84%), aortic arch hypoplasia in 12 (28%), true or false aortic aneurysm in 6 (14%), mitral valve disease in 6 (14%), and subvalvular aortic stenosis in 5 (12%). Surgical procedures included 22 recoarctation repairs and 32 other cardiovascular interventions. Simultaneous repair of recoarctation and associated cardiovascular disease was performed as a single-stage repair in 5 reoperations through a median sternotomy using an extra-anatomic, ascending-to-descending aortic bypass, with no complications. One patient died (surgical mortality, 1.9%) of preexisting severe pulmonary vascular obstructive disease. Conclusions: After coarctation repair, associated cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause for reoperation. An individualized surgical approach is important and may range from valve replacement or recoarctation surgery to extra-anatomic bypass combined with other cardiovascular procedures, enabling simultaneous repair of recoarctation and associated lesions. Despite complex surgical techniques and multiple reoperations, morbidity and mortality were low in our series.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)646-653
Number of pages8
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume77
Issue number7
StatePublished - 2002

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Aortic Coarctation
Reoperation
Cardiovascular Diseases
Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis
Sternotomy
Mortality
Aortic Aneurysm
False Aneurysm
Cardiac Catheterization
Thoracic Aorta
Mitral Valve
Vascular Diseases
Morbidity
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Attenhofer Jost, C. H., Schaff, H. V., Connolly, H. M., Danielson, G. K., Dearani, J. A., Puga, F. J., & Warnes, C. A. (2002). Spectrum of reoperations after repair of aortic coarctation: Importance of an individualized approach because of coexistent cardiovascular disease. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 77(7), 646-653.

Spectrum of reoperations after repair of aortic coarctation : Importance of an individualized approach because of coexistent cardiovascular disease. / Attenhofer Jost, Christine H.; Schaff, Hartzell V; Connolly, Heidi M.; Danielson, Gordon K.; Dearani, Joseph A.; Puga, Francisco J.; Warnes, Carole A.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 77, No. 7, 2002, p. 646-653.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Attenhofer Jost, CH, Schaff, HV, Connolly, HM, Danielson, GK, Dearani, JA, Puga, FJ & Warnes, CA 2002, 'Spectrum of reoperations after repair of aortic coarctation: Importance of an individualized approach because of coexistent cardiovascular disease', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 77, no. 7, pp. 646-653.
Attenhofer Jost, Christine H. ; Schaff, Hartzell V ; Connolly, Heidi M. ; Danielson, Gordon K. ; Dearani, Joseph A. ; Puga, Francisco J. ; Warnes, Carole A. / Spectrum of reoperations after repair of aortic coarctation : Importance of an individualized approach because of coexistent cardiovascular disease. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2002 ; Vol. 77, No. 7. pp. 646-653.
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