Spectral pulsed tissue Doppler imaging in diastole: A tool to increase our insight in and assessment of diastolic relaxation of the left ventricle

Bart W.L. De Boeck, Maarten Jan M. Cramer, Jae K. Oh, Ronald P.L.M. Van Der Aa, Wybren Jaarsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Conventional Doppler echocardiography offers an indirect assessment of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function, hampered by preload dependency. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a tool to study diastolic function in a more direct and less preload-dependent manner. Methods: The Medline database has been searched for literature on TDI for the analysis of diastolic function. A secondary search reviewed the relevant references related to TDI or diastolic function in general. Results: TDI measures myocardial velocities with a high temporal and velocity resolution but lacks spatial information. In particular, the velocity of early diastolic wall motion (Em) and its timing are promising indices of local myocardial relaxation. Em at the mitral annulus offers fair estimates of ventricular relaxation, relatively independent of preload and systolic function. Combined with early transmitral flow velocity (E), detection of pseudo-normalized filling patterns and estimation of filling pressures are enhanced by E/Em. Conclusion: TDI has an emerging role in the study and assessment of diastolic function. However, TDI-derived information needs to be integrated with other echocardiographic data because single diagnostic accuracy remains unsatisfactory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-419
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume146
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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