Sp1- and Krüppel-like transcription factors

Joanna Kaczynski, Tiffany Cook, Raul Urrutia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

607 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

like proteins and Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) are highly related zinc-finger proteins that are important components of the eukaryotic cellular transcriptional machinery. By regulating the expression of a large number of genes that have GC-rich promoters, Sp1-like/KLF transcription regulators may take part in virtually all facets of cellular function, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation. Individual members of the Sp1-like/KLF family can function as activators or repressors depending on which promoter they bind and the coregulators with which they interact. A long-standing research aim has been to define the mechanisms by which Sp1-like factors and KLFs regulate gene expression and cellular function in a cell- and promoter-specific manner. Most members of this family have been identified in mammals, with at least 21 Sp1-like/KLF proteins encoded in the human genome, and members are also found in frogs, worms and flies. Sp1-like/KLF proteins have highly conserved carboxy-terminal zinc-finger domains that function in DNA binding. The amino terminus, containing the transcription activation domain, can vary significantly between family members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number206
JournalGenome Biology
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Transcription Factors
transcription factors
protein
zinc finger motif
Zinc Fingers
promoter regions
Proteins
proteins
zinc
Activator Appliances
apoptosis
Human Genome
transcriptional activation
Diptera
frog
Anura
machinery
Transcriptional Activation
gene expression
frogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Cell Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Sp1- and Krüppel-like transcription factors. / Kaczynski, Joanna; Cook, Tiffany; Urrutia, Raul.

In: Genome Biology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 206, 2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaczynski, J, Cook, T & Urrutia, R 2003, 'Sp1- and Krüppel-like transcription factors', Genome Biology, vol. 4, no. 2, 206. https://doi.org/10.1186/gb-2003-4-2-206
Kaczynski, Joanna ; Cook, Tiffany ; Urrutia, Raul. / Sp1- and Krüppel-like transcription factors. In: Genome Biology. 2003 ; Vol. 4, No. 2.
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