SoftHand at the CYBATHLON: A user's experience Olivier Lambercy; Roger Gassert

Sasha Blue Godfrey, Matteo Rossi, Cristina Piazza, Manuel Giuseppe Catalano, Matteo Bianchi, Giorgio Grioli, Kristin D Zhao, Antonio Bicchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Roughly one-quarter of upper limb prosthesis users reject their prosthesis. Reasons for rejection range from comfort, to cost, aesthetics, function, and more. This paper follows a single user from training with and testing of a novel upper-limb myoelectric prosthesis (the SoftHand Pro) for participation in the CYBATHLON rehearsal to training for and competing in the CYBATHLON 2016 with a figure-of-nine harness controlled powered prosthesis (SoftHand Pro-H) to explore the feasibility and usability of a flexible anthropomorphic prosthetic hand. Methods: The CYBATHLON pilot took part in multiple in-lab training sessions with the SoftHand Pro and SoftHand Pro-H; these sessions focused on basic control and use of the prosthetic devices and direct training of the tasks in the CYBATHLON. He used these devices in competition in the Powered Arm Prosthesis Race in the CYBATHLON rehearsal and 2016 events. Results: In training for the CYBATHLON rehearsal, the subject was able to quickly improve performance with the myoelectric SHP despite typically using a body-powered prosthetic hook. The subject improved further with additional training using the figure-of-nine harness-controlled SHPH in preparation for the CYBATHLON. The Pilot placed 3rd (out of 4) in the rehearsal. In the CYBATHLON, he placed 5th (out of 12) and was one of only two pilots who successfully completed all tasks in the competition, having the second-highest score overall. Conclusions: Results with the SoftHand Pro and Pro-H suggest it to be a viable alternative to existing anthropomorphic hands and show that the unique flexibility of the hand is easily learned and exploited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number124
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 29 2017

Fingerprint

Artificial Limbs
Hand
Upper Extremity
Prostheses and Implants
Equipment and Supplies
Esthetics
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Limb loss
  • Prostheses
  • Robotic hand
  • Upper limb

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Godfrey, S. B., Rossi, M., Piazza, C., Catalano, M. G., Bianchi, M., Grioli, G., ... Bicchi, A. (2017). SoftHand at the CYBATHLON: A user's experience Olivier Lambercy; Roger Gassert. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 14(1), [124]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12984-017-0334-y

SoftHand at the CYBATHLON : A user's experience Olivier Lambercy; Roger Gassert. / Godfrey, Sasha Blue; Rossi, Matteo; Piazza, Cristina; Catalano, Manuel Giuseppe; Bianchi, Matteo; Grioli, Giorgio; Zhao, Kristin D; Bicchi, Antonio.

In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, Vol. 14, No. 1, 124, 29.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Godfrey, Sasha Blue ; Rossi, Matteo ; Piazza, Cristina ; Catalano, Manuel Giuseppe ; Bianchi, Matteo ; Grioli, Giorgio ; Zhao, Kristin D ; Bicchi, Antonio. / SoftHand at the CYBATHLON : A user's experience Olivier Lambercy; Roger Gassert. In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation. 2017 ; Vol. 14, No. 1.
@article{0e0d1ee637e34735bcc9a88da8ec3f5b,
title = "SoftHand at the CYBATHLON: A user's experience Olivier Lambercy; Roger Gassert",
abstract = "Background: Roughly one-quarter of upper limb prosthesis users reject their prosthesis. Reasons for rejection range from comfort, to cost, aesthetics, function, and more. This paper follows a single user from training with and testing of a novel upper-limb myoelectric prosthesis (the SoftHand Pro) for participation in the CYBATHLON rehearsal to training for and competing in the CYBATHLON 2016 with a figure-of-nine harness controlled powered prosthesis (SoftHand Pro-H) to explore the feasibility and usability of a flexible anthropomorphic prosthetic hand. Methods: The CYBATHLON pilot took part in multiple in-lab training sessions with the SoftHand Pro and SoftHand Pro-H; these sessions focused on basic control and use of the prosthetic devices and direct training of the tasks in the CYBATHLON. He used these devices in competition in the Powered Arm Prosthesis Race in the CYBATHLON rehearsal and 2016 events. Results: In training for the CYBATHLON rehearsal, the subject was able to quickly improve performance with the myoelectric SHP despite typically using a body-powered prosthetic hook. The subject improved further with additional training using the figure-of-nine harness-controlled SHPH in preparation for the CYBATHLON. The Pilot placed 3rd (out of 4) in the rehearsal. In the CYBATHLON, he placed 5th (out of 12) and was one of only two pilots who successfully completed all tasks in the competition, having the second-highest score overall. Conclusions: Results with the SoftHand Pro and Pro-H suggest it to be a viable alternative to existing anthropomorphic hands and show that the unique flexibility of the hand is easily learned and exploited.",
keywords = "Limb loss, Prostheses, Robotic hand, Upper limb",
author = "Godfrey, {Sasha Blue} and Matteo Rossi and Cristina Piazza and Catalano, {Manuel Giuseppe} and Matteo Bianchi and Giorgio Grioli and Zhao, {Kristin D} and Antonio Bicchi",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1186/s12984-017-0334-y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
journal = "Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation",
issn = "1743-0003",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - SoftHand at the CYBATHLON

T2 - A user's experience Olivier Lambercy; Roger Gassert

AU - Godfrey, Sasha Blue

AU - Rossi, Matteo

AU - Piazza, Cristina

AU - Catalano, Manuel Giuseppe

AU - Bianchi, Matteo

AU - Grioli, Giorgio

AU - Zhao, Kristin D

AU - Bicchi, Antonio

PY - 2017/11/29

Y1 - 2017/11/29

N2 - Background: Roughly one-quarter of upper limb prosthesis users reject their prosthesis. Reasons for rejection range from comfort, to cost, aesthetics, function, and more. This paper follows a single user from training with and testing of a novel upper-limb myoelectric prosthesis (the SoftHand Pro) for participation in the CYBATHLON rehearsal to training for and competing in the CYBATHLON 2016 with a figure-of-nine harness controlled powered prosthesis (SoftHand Pro-H) to explore the feasibility and usability of a flexible anthropomorphic prosthetic hand. Methods: The CYBATHLON pilot took part in multiple in-lab training sessions with the SoftHand Pro and SoftHand Pro-H; these sessions focused on basic control and use of the prosthetic devices and direct training of the tasks in the CYBATHLON. He used these devices in competition in the Powered Arm Prosthesis Race in the CYBATHLON rehearsal and 2016 events. Results: In training for the CYBATHLON rehearsal, the subject was able to quickly improve performance with the myoelectric SHP despite typically using a body-powered prosthetic hook. The subject improved further with additional training using the figure-of-nine harness-controlled SHPH in preparation for the CYBATHLON. The Pilot placed 3rd (out of 4) in the rehearsal. In the CYBATHLON, he placed 5th (out of 12) and was one of only two pilots who successfully completed all tasks in the competition, having the second-highest score overall. Conclusions: Results with the SoftHand Pro and Pro-H suggest it to be a viable alternative to existing anthropomorphic hands and show that the unique flexibility of the hand is easily learned and exploited.

AB - Background: Roughly one-quarter of upper limb prosthesis users reject their prosthesis. Reasons for rejection range from comfort, to cost, aesthetics, function, and more. This paper follows a single user from training with and testing of a novel upper-limb myoelectric prosthesis (the SoftHand Pro) for participation in the CYBATHLON rehearsal to training for and competing in the CYBATHLON 2016 with a figure-of-nine harness controlled powered prosthesis (SoftHand Pro-H) to explore the feasibility and usability of a flexible anthropomorphic prosthetic hand. Methods: The CYBATHLON pilot took part in multiple in-lab training sessions with the SoftHand Pro and SoftHand Pro-H; these sessions focused on basic control and use of the prosthetic devices and direct training of the tasks in the CYBATHLON. He used these devices in competition in the Powered Arm Prosthesis Race in the CYBATHLON rehearsal and 2016 events. Results: In training for the CYBATHLON rehearsal, the subject was able to quickly improve performance with the myoelectric SHP despite typically using a body-powered prosthetic hook. The subject improved further with additional training using the figure-of-nine harness-controlled SHPH in preparation for the CYBATHLON. The Pilot placed 3rd (out of 4) in the rehearsal. In the CYBATHLON, he placed 5th (out of 12) and was one of only two pilots who successfully completed all tasks in the competition, having the second-highest score overall. Conclusions: Results with the SoftHand Pro and Pro-H suggest it to be a viable alternative to existing anthropomorphic hands and show that the unique flexibility of the hand is easily learned and exploited.

KW - Limb loss

KW - Prostheses

KW - Robotic hand

KW - Upper limb

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85036505865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85036505865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12984-017-0334-y

DO - 10.1186/s12984-017-0334-y

M3 - Article

C2 - 29187203

AN - SCOPUS:85036505865

VL - 14

JO - Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

SN - 1743-0003

IS - 1

M1 - 124

ER -