SIRT1-Activating compounds (STAC) negatively regulate pancreatic cancer cell growth and viability through a SIRT1 lysosomal-dependent pathway

Claudia C.S. Chini, Jair M. Espindola-Netto, Gourish Mondal, Anatilde M.Gonzalez Guerrico, Veronica Nin, Carlos Escande, Mauro Sola-Penna, Jin San Zhang, Daniel D. Billadeau, Eduardo N. Chini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Recent studies suggest that SIRT1-activating compounds (STAC) are a promising class of anticancer drugs, although their mechanism of action remains elusive. The main goal of this study is to determine the role of STACs as a potential therapy for pancreatic cancer. In addition, we also explored the mechanism by which these compounds affect pancreatic cancer. Experimental design: Using in vitro (cell culture experiments) and in vivo (xenograft experiments) approaches, we studied the role of SIRT1 agonists (STAC) in human pancreatic cancer cell viability and growth. Results: We show that SIRT1 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells and that the STACs SRT1720, SRT1460, and SRT3025 inhibited cell growth and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. STACs enhanced the sensitivity of pancreatic cells to gemcitabine and paclitaxel, indicating that these drugs could be used in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. We also show that STACs were very effective in inhibiting tumor xenograft growth. In mechanistic studies, we observed that STACs activated a SIRT1 lysosomal-dependent cell death. Furthermore, the effect of STACs on cell viability was also dependent on the expression of the endogenous SIRT1 inhibitor DBC1. Conclusions: Taken together, our results reveal an essential role for SIRT1 and lysosomes in the death pathway regulated by STACs in pancreatic cancer cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2496-2507
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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