Single-incision laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease and polyposis syndromes

Donald Dean Potter, Jeanne Tung, William Alvis Faubion, Christopher Moir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Minimally invasive procedures for inflammatory bowel disease have been shown to improve recovery in children. We report our initial experience with single-incision laparoscopic operations for pediatric intestinal disease. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 12 procedures in 11 patients (4 women) from March 2010 to January 2011. Procedures were conducted by using standard laparoscopic instruments. Results: Mean age was 15 years (9-17 years). Procedures included three total abdominal colectomies, four two-stage ileal-pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA), two single-stage IPAA, two three-stage IPAA, and one ileocectomy. An accessory umbilical port was used in 6 cases. Mean operating time was 287 minutes. Mean length of stay was 4.1 days (3-9 days). Postoperative complications have occurred in 5 patients (42%). Anastomotic leak occurred in 2 patients with IPAA without protective ileostomy, 1 operative small bowel obstruction, 1 pelvic abscess and portal vein thrombosis, and 1 readmission for dehydration. Both patients who had leaked have recovered well and had their stomas reversed. Mean follow-up is 190 days. Average number of daily bowel movements is 4.5. Pouchitis has occurred in 50% (4/8) of patients. Conclusions: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery for pediatric intestinal disease is safe and feasible by using standard laparoscopic instruments. We do not advocate IPAA without a stoma due to the high rate of anastomotic leak. Continued experience will shorten operative times and reduce complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-207
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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Colonic Pouches
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Colon
Pediatrics
Intestinal Diseases
Anastomotic Leak
Pouchitis
Umbilicus
Ileostomy
Colectomy
Operative Time
Portal Vein
Dehydration
Laparoscopy
Abscess
Length of Stay
Thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Single-incision laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease and polyposis syndromes. / Potter, Donald Dean; Tung, Jeanne; Faubion, William Alvis; Moir, Christopher.

In: Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 203-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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