Similarities in the behavior and molecular deficits in the frontal cortex between the neurotensin receptor subtype 1 knockout mice and chronic phencyclidine-treated mice: Relevance to schizophrenia

Zhimin Li, Mona Boules, Katrina Williams, Andres Gordillo, Shuhua Li, Elliott Richelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Much evidence suggests that targeting the neurotensin (NT) system may provide a novel and promising treatment for schizophrenia. Our recent work shows that: NTS1 knockout (NTS1-/-) mice may provide a potential animal model for studying schizophrenia by investigating the effect of deletion NTS1 receptor on amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and neurochemical changes. The data indicate a hyper-dopaminergic state similar to the excessive striatal DA activity reported in schizophrenia. The present study was done to determine if NTS1-/- mice also have similar changes in behavior, in prefrontal neurotransmitters, and in protein expression, as observed in wild type (WT) mice treated with the psychotomimetic phencylclidine (PCP), an animal model for schizophrenia. Our results showed many similarities between untreated NTS1-/- mice and WT mice chronically treated with PCP (as compared with untreated WT mice): 1) lower PCP-induced locomotor activity; 2) similar avolition-like behavior in forced-swim test and tail suspension test; 3) lower prefrontal glutamate levels; 4) less PCP-induced dopamine release in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); and 5) down-regulation of mRNA and protein for DA D1, DA D2, and NMDAR2A in mPFC. Therefore, these data strengthen the hypothesis that the NTS1-/- mouse is an animal model of schizophrenia, particularly for the dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex. In addition, after chronic PCP administration, the DA D1 receptor was up-regulated in NTS1-/- mice, results which suggest a possible interaction of NTS1/DA D1 in mPFC contributing to chronic PCP-induced schizophrenia-like signs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-477
Number of pages11
JournalNeurobiology of Disease
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Phencyclidine
Frontal Lobe
Knockout Mice
Schizophrenia
Prefrontal Cortex
Animal Models
Hindlimb Suspension
Corpus Striatum
Neurotensin
Locomotion
Neurotransmitter Agents
neurotensin type 1 receptor
Glutamic Acid
Dopamine
Proteins
Down-Regulation
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Dopamine
  • Glutamate
  • Neurotensin receptor
  • Phencyclidine
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology

Cite this

Similarities in the behavior and molecular deficits in the frontal cortex between the neurotensin receptor subtype 1 knockout mice and chronic phencyclidine-treated mice : Relevance to schizophrenia. / Li, Zhimin; Boules, Mona; Williams, Katrina; Gordillo, Andres; Li, Shuhua; Richelson, Elliott.

In: Neurobiology of Disease, Vol. 40, No. 2, 11.2010, p. 467-477.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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