Should antihepatitis B virus core positive or antihepatitis C virus core positive subjects be accepted as organ donors for liver transplantation?

Juan F. Gallegos-Orozco, Hugo E Vargas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the introduction of liver transplantation as a routine surgical procedure for the treatment of end-stage liver disease, there has been an increasing gap between the number of available grafts and the number of patients on the waiting list. This has led transplant centers to expand the donor pool by different means. One of them has been the introduction of living donor liver transplantation. Other strategies include using less than optimal allografts from deceased donors, the so-called marginal donors, which include the use of grafts from older subjects, livers with moderate amounts of steatosis, or from donors with markers of past or current infection with hepatitis viruses who have absent or minimal liver biochemical or histologic injury. In this review, we will focus on the current use of allografts from donors with antihepatitis B core antibody and/or antibodies against hepatitis C virus in cadaveric and living donor liver transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-74
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1
Liver Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Viruses
Living Donors
Transplants
Allografts
Hepatitis Viruses
End Stage Liver Disease
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Waiting Lists
Liver
Antibodies
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

Keywords

  • Antihepatitis B core antibodies
  • Antihepatitis C virus antibodies
  • Liver transplantation
  • Living donor liver transplantation
  • Marginal donor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{0e0990dcdbf24b38a735e83ee539b448,
title = "Should antihepatitis B virus core positive or antihepatitis C virus core positive subjects be accepted as organ donors for liver transplantation?",
abstract = "Since the introduction of liver transplantation as a routine surgical procedure for the treatment of end-stage liver disease, there has been an increasing gap between the number of available grafts and the number of patients on the waiting list. This has led transplant centers to expand the donor pool by different means. One of them has been the introduction of living donor liver transplantation. Other strategies include using less than optimal allografts from deceased donors, the so-called marginal donors, which include the use of grafts from older subjects, livers with moderate amounts of steatosis, or from donors with markers of past or current infection with hepatitis viruses who have absent or minimal liver biochemical or histologic injury. In this review, we will focus on the current use of allografts from donors with antihepatitis B core antibody and/or antibodies against hepatitis C virus in cadaveric and living donor liver transplantation.",
keywords = "Antihepatitis B core antibodies, Antihepatitis C virus antibodies, Liver transplantation, Living donor liver transplantation, Marginal donor",
author = "Gallegos-Orozco, {Juan F.} and Vargas, {Hugo E}",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.mcg.0000225636.60404.bf",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "66--74",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology",
issn = "0192-0790",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Should antihepatitis B virus core positive or antihepatitis C virus core positive subjects be accepted as organ donors for liver transplantation?

AU - Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F.

AU - Vargas, Hugo E

PY - 2007/1

Y1 - 2007/1

N2 - Since the introduction of liver transplantation as a routine surgical procedure for the treatment of end-stage liver disease, there has been an increasing gap between the number of available grafts and the number of patients on the waiting list. This has led transplant centers to expand the donor pool by different means. One of them has been the introduction of living donor liver transplantation. Other strategies include using less than optimal allografts from deceased donors, the so-called marginal donors, which include the use of grafts from older subjects, livers with moderate amounts of steatosis, or from donors with markers of past or current infection with hepatitis viruses who have absent or minimal liver biochemical or histologic injury. In this review, we will focus on the current use of allografts from donors with antihepatitis B core antibody and/or antibodies against hepatitis C virus in cadaveric and living donor liver transplantation.

AB - Since the introduction of liver transplantation as a routine surgical procedure for the treatment of end-stage liver disease, there has been an increasing gap between the number of available grafts and the number of patients on the waiting list. This has led transplant centers to expand the donor pool by different means. One of them has been the introduction of living donor liver transplantation. Other strategies include using less than optimal allografts from deceased donors, the so-called marginal donors, which include the use of grafts from older subjects, livers with moderate amounts of steatosis, or from donors with markers of past or current infection with hepatitis viruses who have absent or minimal liver biochemical or histologic injury. In this review, we will focus on the current use of allografts from donors with antihepatitis B core antibody and/or antibodies against hepatitis C virus in cadaveric and living donor liver transplantation.

KW - Antihepatitis B core antibodies

KW - Antihepatitis C virus antibodies

KW - Liver transplantation

KW - Living donor liver transplantation

KW - Marginal donor

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846001716&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846001716&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.mcg.0000225636.60404.bf

DO - 10.1097/01.mcg.0000225636.60404.bf

M3 - Article

C2 - 17198068

AN - SCOPUS:33846001716

VL - 41

SP - 66

EP - 74

JO - Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

JF - Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

SN - 0192-0790

IS - 1

ER -