Short-wavelength automated perimetry can predict glaucomatous standard visual field loss by ten years

Arthur J Sit, Felipe A. Medeiros, Robert N. Weinreb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examination of visual fields using standard achromatic automated perimetry (SAP) is essential for glaucoma management. However, as many as 35-50% of retinal ganglion cells can be lost before a visual field defect is detected.1,2,3 Previous studies have indicated that examination of the short-wavelength (blue) sensitive color system may be able to detect early functional loss in glaucoma. Moreover, it has been reported to detect glaucomatous visual field loss as many as 5 years earlier than SAP. 4,5,6,7 We describe the case of a patient who demonstrated visual field defects on short-wavelength automated perimetry (SWAP) ten years prior to developing visual field defects in SAP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-124
Number of pages3
JournalSeminars in Ophthalmology
Volume19
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Visual Field Tests
Visual Fields
Glaucoma
Retinal Ganglion Cells
Color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Short-wavelength automated perimetry can predict glaucomatous standard visual field loss by ten years. / Sit, Arthur J; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Weinreb, Robert N.

In: Seminars in Ophthalmology, Vol. 19, No. 3-4, 09.2004, p. 122-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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