Short-term regional meal fat storage in nonobese humans is not a predictor of long-term regional fat gain

Susanne B. Votruba, Michael D. Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although body fat distribution strongly predicts metabolic health outcomes related to excess weight, little is known about the factors an individual might exhibit that predict a particular fat distribution pattern. We utilized the meal fatty acid tracer-adipose biopsy technique to assess upper and lower body subcutaneous (UBSQ and LBSQ, respectively) meal fat storage in lean volunteers who then were overfed to gain weight. Meal fatty acid storage in UBSQ and LBSQ adipose tissue, as well as daytime substrate oxidation (indirect calorimetry), was measured in 28 nonobese volunteers [n = 15 men, body mass index = 22.1 ± 2.5 (SD)] before and after an ~8-wk period of supervised overfeeding (weight gain = 4.6 ± 2.2 kg, fat gain = 3.8 ± 1.7 kg). Meal fat storage (mg/g adipose tissue lipid) in UBSQ (visit 1: 0.78 ± 0.34 and 1.04 ± 0.71 for women and men, respectively, P = 0.22; visit 2: 0.71 ± 0.24 and 0.90 ± 0.37 for women and men, respectively, P = 0.08) and LBSQ (visit 1: 0.60 ± 0.23 and 0.48 ± 0.29 for women and men, respectively, P = 0.25; visit 2: 0.62 ± 0.24 and 0.65 ± 0.23 for women and men, respectively, P = 0.67) adipose tissue did not differ between men and women at either visit. Fractional meal fatty acid storage in UBSQ (0.31 ± 0.15) or LBSQ (0.19 ± 0.13) adipose tissue at visit 1 did not predict the percent change in regional body fat in response to overfeeding. These data indicate that meal fat uptake trafficking in the short term (24 h) is not predictive of body fat distribution patterns. In general, UBSQ adipose tissue appears to be a favored depot for meal fat deposition in both sexes, and redistribution of meal fatty acids likely takes place at later time periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E1078-E1083
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume302
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

Keywords

  • Adipose Tissue
  • Body Fat Distribution
  • Fat Biopsy
  • [ H]triolein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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