Shifting the optimal stiffness for cell migration

Benjamin L. Bangasser, Ghaidan A. Shamsan, Clarence E. Chan, Kwaku N. Opoku, Erkan Tüzel, Benjamin W. Schlichtmann, Jesse A. Kasim, Benjamin J. Fuller, Brannon R. McCullough, Steven Rosenfeld, David J. Odde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cell migration, which is central to many biological processes including wound healing and cancer progression, is sensitive to environmental stiffness, and many cell types exhibit a stiffness optimum, at which migration is maximal. Here we present a cell migration simulator that predicts a stiffness optimum that can be shifted by altering the number of active molecular motors and clutches. This prediction is verified experimentally by comparing cell traction and F-actin retrograde flow for two cell types with differing amounts of active motors and clutches: embryonic chick forebrain neurons (ECFNs; optimum ∼ 1 kPa) and U251 glioma cells (optimum ∼ 100 kPa). In addition, the model predicts, and experiments confirm, that the stiffness optimum of U251 glioma cell migration, morphology and F-actin retrograde flow rate can be shifted to lower stiffness by simultaneous drug inhibition of myosin II motors and integrin-mediated adhesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number15313
JournalNature Communications
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 22 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cell Movement
stiffness
Stiffness
cells
Glioma
Clutches
Actins
clutches
Myosin Type II
Biological Phenomena
Traction
Prosencephalon
Integrins
Wound Healing
myosins
wound healing
Neurons
traction
Adhesion
Simulators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Bangasser, B. L., Shamsan, G. A., Chan, C. E., Opoku, K. N., Tüzel, E., Schlichtmann, B. W., ... Odde, D. J. (2017). Shifting the optimal stiffness for cell migration. Nature Communications, 8, [15313]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15313

Shifting the optimal stiffness for cell migration. / Bangasser, Benjamin L.; Shamsan, Ghaidan A.; Chan, Clarence E.; Opoku, Kwaku N.; Tüzel, Erkan; Schlichtmann, Benjamin W.; Kasim, Jesse A.; Fuller, Benjamin J.; McCullough, Brannon R.; Rosenfeld, Steven; Odde, David J.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 8, 15313, 22.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bangasser, BL, Shamsan, GA, Chan, CE, Opoku, KN, Tüzel, E, Schlichtmann, BW, Kasim, JA, Fuller, BJ, McCullough, BR, Rosenfeld, S & Odde, DJ 2017, 'Shifting the optimal stiffness for cell migration', Nature Communications, vol. 8, 15313. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15313
Bangasser BL, Shamsan GA, Chan CE, Opoku KN, Tüzel E, Schlichtmann BW et al. Shifting the optimal stiffness for cell migration. Nature Communications. 2017 May 22;8. 15313. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15313
Bangasser, Benjamin L. ; Shamsan, Ghaidan A. ; Chan, Clarence E. ; Opoku, Kwaku N. ; Tüzel, Erkan ; Schlichtmann, Benjamin W. ; Kasim, Jesse A. ; Fuller, Benjamin J. ; McCullough, Brannon R. ; Rosenfeld, Steven ; Odde, David J. / Shifting the optimal stiffness for cell migration. In: Nature Communications. 2017 ; Vol. 8.
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