Sex preferences for colonoscopists and GI physicians among patients and health care professionals

Deepa K. Shah, Veronika Karasek, Richard D. Gerkin, Francisco C Ramirez, Michele A. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are indications that many women prefer female health care providers. Objective: To determine whether (1) patients and health care professionals have sex preferences for gastroenterologists (for office visit and colonoscopy) and (2) the reasons behind these preferences. Design: Prospective survey. Setting: Patients from primary care clinics at a Veterans Affairs and a community hospital and health care professionals. Patients: A total of 1364 individuals completed the survey: 840 patients (566 men and 274 women) and 524 health care professionals (211 men and 313 women). Main Outcome Measurements: Sex preferences for colonoscopists and gastroenterologists at a clinic. Results: Women had a stronger sex preference (compared with no preference) for an office visit with a gastroenterologist (44.3%) and for a colonoscopist (53%) than men (23% and 27.8% respectively; P < .001). For health care professionals, there was a significant difference in sex preferences for women and men for a gastroenterologist office visit (30.4% vs 17.6%; P < .001) and for a colonoscopist (43.1% vs 26.1%; P < .001). Of all respondents with a sex preference, the most common reason was embarrassment for both office visit and colonoscopy. For all respondents with a sex preference for colonoscopy, a higher level of education was an independent predictor of patients feeling embarrassed (P = .003). Limitations: Single city, patient population from only 2 institutions. Conclusions: Female patients and female health care professionals have sex preferences in choosing a gastroenterologist for an office visit and colonoscopy, and the reasons for this are significantly influenced by their level of education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-127
Number of pages6
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Office Visits
Patient Care
Colonoscopy
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Education
Community Health Services
Community Hospital
Women's Health
Veterans
Sex Characteristics
Health Personnel
Primary Health Care
Emotions
Gastroenterologists
Surveys and Questionnaires
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Sex preferences for colonoscopists and GI physicians among patients and health care professionals. / Shah, Deepa K.; Karasek, Veronika; Gerkin, Richard D.; Ramirez, Francisco C; Young, Michele A.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 74, No. 1, 07.2011, p. 122-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shah, Deepa K. ; Karasek, Veronika ; Gerkin, Richard D. ; Ramirez, Francisco C ; Young, Michele A. / Sex preferences for colonoscopists and GI physicians among patients and health care professionals. In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2011 ; Vol. 74, No. 1. pp. 122-127.
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