Sex Disparities in the Use and Outcomes of Temporary Mechanical Circulatory Support for Acute Myocardial Infarction-Cardiogenic Shock

Saraschandra Vallabhajosyula, Shannon M. Dunlay, Gregory W. Barsness, P. Elliott Miller, Wisit Cheungpasitporn, John M. Stulak, Charanjit S. Rihal, David R. Holmes, Malcolm R. Bell, Virginia M. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: There are limited sex-specific data on patients receiving temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) for acute myocardial infarction-cardiogenic shock (AMI-CS). Methods: All admissions with AMI-CS with MCS use were identified using the National Inpatient Sample from 2005 to 2016. Outcomes of interest included in-hospital mortality, discharge disposition, use of palliative care and do-not-resuscitate (DNR) status, and receipt of durable left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and cardiac transplantation. Results: In AMI-CS admissions during this 12-year period, MCS was used more frequently in men—50.4% vs 39.5%; P < 0.001. Of the 173,473 who received MCS (32% women), intra-aortic balloon pumps, percutaneous LVAD, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and ≥ 2 MCS devices were used in 92%, 4%, 1%, and 3%, respectively. Women were on average older (69 ± 12 vs 64 ± 13 years), of black race (10% vs 6%), and had more comorbidity (mean Charlson comorbidity index 5.0 ± 2.0 vs 4.5 ± 2.1). Women had higher in-hospital mortality than men (34% vs 29%, adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16-1.23; P < 0.001) overall, in intra-aortic balloon pumps users (OR: 1.20 [95% CI: 1.16-1.23]; P < 0.001), and percutaneous LVAD users (OR: 1.75 [95% CI: 1.49-2.06]; P < 0.001), but not in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or ≥ 2 MCS device users (P > 0.05). Women had higher use of palliative care, DNR status, and discharges to skilled nursing facilities. Conclusions: There are persistent sex disparities in the outcomes of AMI-CS admissions receiving MCS support. Women have higher in-hospital mortality, palliative care consultation, and use of DNR status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)462-472
Number of pages11
JournalCJC Open
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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