Sex disparities in acute kidney injury complicating acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock

Saraschandra Vallabhajosyula, Lina Ya'Qoub, Shannon M. Dunlay, Saarwaani Vallabhajosyula, Shashaank Vallabhajosyula, Pranathi R. Sundaragiri, Allan S. Jaffe, Bernard J. Gersh, Kianoush Kashani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: To evaluate sex-specific disparities in acute kidney injury (AKI) complicating acute myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock (AMI-CS) in the United States. Methods and results: This was a retrospective cohort study from 2000 to 2014 from the National Inpatient Sample (20% sample of all hospitals in the United States). Patients >18 years admitted with a primary diagnosis of AMI and concomitant CS that developed AKI were included. The endpoints of interest were the prevalence, trends, and outcomes of men and women with AKI in AMI-CS. Multivariable hierarchical logistic regression was used to control for confounding, and a two-sided P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. During this 15 year period, 440 257 admissions with AMI-CS met the inclusion criteria, with AKI noted in 155 610 (35.3%). Women constituted 36.3% of the cohort and were older, of non-White race, and with higher co-morbidity compared with men. Women with AKI less often received coronary angiography (59% vs. 66%), percutaneous coronary intervention (39% vs. 43%), mechanical circulatory support (39% vs. 48%), mechanical ventilation (49% vs. 54%), and haemodialysis (9% vs. 10%) compared with men (all P < 0.001). Adjusted in-hospital mortality was higher in women—odds ratio 1.16 (95% confidence interval 1.14–1.19); P < 0.001—compared with men. Women had shorter lengths of stay (12 ± 14 vs. 13 ± 14 days), lower hospital costs ($150 071 ± 180 796 vs. $181 260 ± 209 674), and were less often discharged to home (19% vs. 31%) (all P < 0.001). Conclusions: Women with AKI in AMI-CS received fewer cardiac and non-cardiac interventions, had higher in-hospital mortality, and were less often discharged to home compared with men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)874-877
Number of pages4
JournalESC Heart Failure
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

Keywords

  • Acute kidney injury
  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • Cardiogenic shock
  • Haemodialysis
  • Sex-based disparities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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