Sex differences in left ventricular geometry in aortic stenosis: Impact on outcome

Donna L. Milavetz, Sharonne N. Hayes, Susan A. Weston, James B. Seward, Charles J. Mullany, Veronique Lee Roger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study of surgical aortic stenosis characterized sex differences in left ventricular (LV) geometry and outcome. Materials and methods: We examined 92 women and 82 men who underwent echocardiography before valve replacement for aortic stenosis. Results: Women had a smaller cavity size (LV end-diastolic diameter 48.2 ± 7 mm in women vs 53.6 ± 7.6 mm in men; p = 0.0001) and higher ejection fraction (59% in women vs 54% in men; p = 0.02). LV mass was greater in men than women (300.4 ± 88 g in men vs 250.6 ± 85.8g in women; p = 0.0055) but when corrected for body surface area, the difference was not significant. The prevalence of LV hypertrophy was similar in both sexes (51% in women vs 49% in men; p = 0.62). The 5-year survival was 82% in women and 79% in men (p = 0.9). Conclusion: Several descriptors of LV geometry differed between men and women. These differences were largely eliminated after normalizing for body surface area. No differences in surgical mortality or long-term outcome were noted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1094-1099
Number of pages6
JournalChest
Volume117
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2000

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Aortic Valve Stenosis
Sex Characteristics
Body Surface Area
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Echocardiography
Survival
Mortality

Keywords

  • Aortic valve disease
  • Outcome left ventricular geometry
  • Sex difference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Milavetz, D. L., Hayes, S. N., Weston, S. A., Seward, J. B., Mullany, C. J., & Roger, V. L. (2000). Sex differences in left ventricular geometry in aortic stenosis: Impact on outcome. Chest, 117(4), 1094-1099.

Sex differences in left ventricular geometry in aortic stenosis : Impact on outcome. / Milavetz, Donna L.; Hayes, Sharonne N.; Weston, Susan A.; Seward, James B.; Mullany, Charles J.; Roger, Veronique Lee.

In: Chest, Vol. 117, No. 4, 2000, p. 1094-1099.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Milavetz, DL, Hayes, SN, Weston, SA, Seward, JB, Mullany, CJ & Roger, VL 2000, 'Sex differences in left ventricular geometry in aortic stenosis: Impact on outcome', Chest, vol. 117, no. 4, pp. 1094-1099.
Milavetz DL, Hayes SN, Weston SA, Seward JB, Mullany CJ, Roger VL. Sex differences in left ventricular geometry in aortic stenosis: Impact on outcome. Chest. 2000;117(4):1094-1099.
Milavetz, Donna L. ; Hayes, Sharonne N. ; Weston, Susan A. ; Seward, James B. ; Mullany, Charles J. ; Roger, Veronique Lee. / Sex differences in left ventricular geometry in aortic stenosis : Impact on outcome. In: Chest. 2000 ; Vol. 117, No. 4. pp. 1094-1099.
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