Severe congenital neutropenia resulting from G6PC3 deficiency with increased neutrophil CXCR4 expression and myelokathexis

David H. McDermott, Suk See De Ravin, Hyun Sik Jun, Qian Liu, Debra A. Long Priel, Pierre Noel, Clifford M. Takemoto, Teresa Ojode, Scott M. Paul, Kimberly P. Dunsmore, Dianne Hilligoss, Martha Marquesen, Jean Ulrick, Douglas B. Kuhns, Janice Y. Chou, Harry L. Malech, Philip M. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mutations in more than 15 genes are now known to cause severe congenital neutropenia (SCN); however, the pathologic mechanisms of most genetic defects are not fully defined. Deficiency of G6PC3, a glucose-6-phosphatase, causes a rare multisystem syndrome with SCN first described in 2009. We identified a family with 2 children with homozygous G6PC3 G260R mutations, a loss of enzymatic function, and typical syndrome features with the exception that their bone marrow biopsy pathology revealed abundant neutrophils consistent with myelokathexis. This pathologic finding is a hallmark of another type of SCN, WHIM syndrome, which is caused by gain-of-function mutations in CXCR4, a chemokine receptor and known neutrophil bone marrow retention factor. We found markedly increased CXCR4 expression on neutrophils from both our G6PC3-deficient patients and G6pc3-/- mice. In both patients, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment normalized CXCR4 expression and neutrophil counts. In G6pc3-/- mice, the specific CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 rapidly reversed neutropenia. Thus, myelokathexis associated with abnormally high neutrophil CXCR4 expression may contribute to neutropenia in G6PC3 deficiency and responds well to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2793-2802
Number of pages10
JournalBlood
Volume116
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 14 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Bone
Neutrophils
Glucose-6-Phosphatase
Biopsy
Chemokine Receptors
Pathology
Neutropenia
Genes
Mutation
Defects
Bone Marrow
Neutropenia, Severe Congenital, Autosomal Recessive 3
JM 3100

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

McDermott, D. H., De Ravin, S. S., Jun, H. S., Liu, Q., Long Priel, D. A., Noel, P., ... Murphy, P. M. (2010). Severe congenital neutropenia resulting from G6PC3 deficiency with increased neutrophil CXCR4 expression and myelokathexis. Blood, 116(15), 2793-2802. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2010-01-265942

Severe congenital neutropenia resulting from G6PC3 deficiency with increased neutrophil CXCR4 expression and myelokathexis. / McDermott, David H.; De Ravin, Suk See; Jun, Hyun Sik; Liu, Qian; Long Priel, Debra A.; Noel, Pierre; Takemoto, Clifford M.; Ojode, Teresa; Paul, Scott M.; Dunsmore, Kimberly P.; Hilligoss, Dianne; Marquesen, Martha; Ulrick, Jean; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Chou, Janice Y.; Malech, Harry L.; Murphy, Philip M.

In: Blood, Vol. 116, No. 15, 14.10.2010, p. 2793-2802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McDermott, DH, De Ravin, SS, Jun, HS, Liu, Q, Long Priel, DA, Noel, P, Takemoto, CM, Ojode, T, Paul, SM, Dunsmore, KP, Hilligoss, D, Marquesen, M, Ulrick, J, Kuhns, DB, Chou, JY, Malech, HL & Murphy, PM 2010, 'Severe congenital neutropenia resulting from G6PC3 deficiency with increased neutrophil CXCR4 expression and myelokathexis', Blood, vol. 116, no. 15, pp. 2793-2802. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2010-01-265942
McDermott, David H. ; De Ravin, Suk See ; Jun, Hyun Sik ; Liu, Qian ; Long Priel, Debra A. ; Noel, Pierre ; Takemoto, Clifford M. ; Ojode, Teresa ; Paul, Scott M. ; Dunsmore, Kimberly P. ; Hilligoss, Dianne ; Marquesen, Martha ; Ulrick, Jean ; Kuhns, Douglas B. ; Chou, Janice Y. ; Malech, Harry L. ; Murphy, Philip M. / Severe congenital neutropenia resulting from G6PC3 deficiency with increased neutrophil CXCR4 expression and myelokathexis. In: Blood. 2010 ; Vol. 116, No. 15. pp. 2793-2802.
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AU - De Ravin, Suk See

AU - Jun, Hyun Sik

AU - Liu, Qian

AU - Long Priel, Debra A.

AU - Noel, Pierre

AU - Takemoto, Clifford M.

AU - Ojode, Teresa

AU - Paul, Scott M.

AU - Dunsmore, Kimberly P.

AU - Hilligoss, Dianne

AU - Marquesen, Martha

AU - Ulrick, Jean

AU - Kuhns, Douglas B.

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AU - Malech, Harry L.

AU - Murphy, Philip M.

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