Serum leptin and weight gain over 8 years in African American and Caucasian young adults.

A. R. Folsom, Michael Dennis Jensen, D. R. Jacobs, J. E. Hilner, A. W. Tsai, P. J. Schreiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: There is considerable interest in how to prevent weight gain in adulthood. Leptin, a peptide hormone expressed in adipose tissue, is believed to signal the central nervous system about the level of body fat stores, and thereby may control appetite. Little information exists on whether the serum leptin concentration influences long-term weight changes in the free-living population. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: From an ongoing cohort study of young African American and white adults, we selected a sample of participants (n=492), stratified on sex, race, and weight changes over 8 years. Serum leptin was measured on stored specimens using a radioimmunoassay. Weight change was modeled in relation to baseline leptin concentrations. RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, leptin concentration was associated positively with body mass index, negatively with physical activity level, and was higher in women than men. These variables explained 72% of the variance in serum leptin. Over the 8 years, the sample gained an average of 7.8 kg (standard deviation = 10.8). There was no evidence that 8-year weight change was associated with initial leptin concentration: 8-year weight change was only 0.5 kg less (95% confidence interval =-1.8 to 0.8, p = 0.47) per each 10 ng/ mL increment (approximately one standard deviation) of baseline leptin. In contrast, leptin change correlated highly (r=0.62) with weight change. DISCUSSION: Our data corroborate evidence that adiposity determines leptin levels but do not support the hypothesis that leptin deficiency plays an important role in obesity in the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalObesity Research
Volume7
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

African Americans
Leptin
leptin
young adults
Weight Gain
Young Adult
weight gain
Serum
Weights and Measures
Adipose Tissue
peptide hormones
Peptide Hormones
Adiposity
adiposity
Appetite
research methods
appetite
radioimmunoassays
adulthood
cohort studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Folsom, A. R., Jensen, M. D., Jacobs, D. R., Hilner, J. E., Tsai, A. W., & Schreiner, P. J. (1999). Serum leptin and weight gain over 8 years in African American and Caucasian young adults. Obesity Research, 7(1), 1-8.

Serum leptin and weight gain over 8 years in African American and Caucasian young adults. / Folsom, A. R.; Jensen, Michael Dennis; Jacobs, D. R.; Hilner, J. E.; Tsai, A. W.; Schreiner, P. J.

In: Obesity Research, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.1999, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Folsom, AR, Jensen, MD, Jacobs, DR, Hilner, JE, Tsai, AW & Schreiner, PJ 1999, 'Serum leptin and weight gain over 8 years in African American and Caucasian young adults.', Obesity Research, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 1-8.
Folsom, A. R. ; Jensen, Michael Dennis ; Jacobs, D. R. ; Hilner, J. E. ; Tsai, A. W. ; Schreiner, P. J. / Serum leptin and weight gain over 8 years in African American and Caucasian young adults. In: Obesity Research. 1999 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 1-8.
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