Seronegativity for type 1 antineuronal nuclear antibodies ('anti-Hu') in subacute sensory neuronopathy patients without cancer

Colin H. Chalk, Vanda A Lennon, J. Clarke Stevens, Anthony John Windebank

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28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We followed 21 patients with sensory neuronopathy without evidence of cancer for up to 23 years. All were seronegative for type 1 antineuronal nuclear antibodies (ANNA-1, also called "anti-Hu"). We additionally studied 67 seropositive patients with sensory neuronopathy or a related neurologic syndrome. Ninety-one percent of the seropositive patients had a small-cell lung carcinoma. One, with a normal chest x-ray, had been followed for 7 years for sensory neuronopathy of indeterminate cause before serologic testing for ANNA-1 led to the discovery of the tumor by CT. We conclude that ANNA-1 seropositivity in a patient with sensory neuronopathy is strong evidence for an underlying small-cell lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2209-2211
Number of pages3
JournalNeurology
Volume43
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1993

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Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Nervous System
Thorax
X-Rays
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Seronegativity for type 1 antineuronal nuclear antibodies ('anti-Hu') in subacute sensory neuronopathy patients without cancer. / Chalk, Colin H.; Lennon, Vanda A; Stevens, J. Clarke; Windebank, Anthony John.

In: Neurology, Vol. 43, No. 11, 11.1993, p. 2209-2211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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