Senescent cells

an emerging target for diseases of ageing

Bennett G. Childs, Martina Gluscevic, Darren J Baker, Remi Martin Laberge, Dan Marquess, Jamie Dananberg, Jan Van Deursen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronological age represents the single greatest risk factor for human disease. One plausible explanation for this correlation is that mechanisms that drive ageing might also promote age-related diseases. Cellular senescence, which is a permanent state of cell cycle arrest induced by cellular stress, has recently emerged as a fundamental ageing mechanism that also contributes to diseases of late life, including cancer, atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis. Therapeutic strategies that safely interfere with the detrimental effects of cellular senescence, such as the selective elimination of senescent cells (SNCs) or the disruption of the SNC secretome, are gaining significant attention, with several programmes now nearing human clinical studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-735
Number of pages18
JournalNature reviews. Drug discovery
Volume16
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Cell Aging
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Osteoarthritis
Atherosclerosis
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Clinical Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Senescent cells : an emerging target for diseases of ageing. / Childs, Bennett G.; Gluscevic, Martina; Baker, Darren J; Laberge, Remi Martin; Marquess, Dan; Dananberg, Jamie; Van Deursen, Jan.

In: Nature reviews. Drug discovery, Vol. 16, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 718-735.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Childs, BG, Gluscevic, M, Baker, DJ, Laberge, RM, Marquess, D, Dananberg, J & Van Deursen, J 2017, 'Senescent cells: an emerging target for diseases of ageing', Nature reviews. Drug discovery, vol. 16, no. 10, pp. 718-735. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd.2017.116
Childs BG, Gluscevic M, Baker DJ, Laberge RM, Marquess D, Dananberg J et al. Senescent cells: an emerging target for diseases of ageing. Nature reviews. Drug discovery. 2017 Oct 1;16(10):718-735. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd.2017.116
Childs, Bennett G. ; Gluscevic, Martina ; Baker, Darren J ; Laberge, Remi Martin ; Marquess, Dan ; Dananberg, Jamie ; Van Deursen, Jan. / Senescent cells : an emerging target for diseases of ageing. In: Nature reviews. Drug discovery. 2017 ; Vol. 16, No. 10. pp. 718-735.
@article{b0ddcbe396f6463a838f46c307f7836b,
title = "Senescent cells: an emerging target for diseases of ageing",
abstract = "Chronological age represents the single greatest risk factor for human disease. One plausible explanation for this correlation is that mechanisms that drive ageing might also promote age-related diseases. Cellular senescence, which is a permanent state of cell cycle arrest induced by cellular stress, has recently emerged as a fundamental ageing mechanism that also contributes to diseases of late life, including cancer, atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis. Therapeutic strategies that safely interfere with the detrimental effects of cellular senescence, such as the selective elimination of senescent cells (SNCs) or the disruption of the SNC secretome, are gaining significant attention, with several programmes now nearing human clinical studies.",
author = "Childs, {Bennett G.} and Martina Gluscevic and Baker, {Darren J} and Laberge, {Remi Martin} and Dan Marquess and Jamie Dananberg and {Van Deursen}, Jan",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nrd.2017.116",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "718--735",
journal = "Nature Reviews Drug Discovery",
issn = "1474-1776",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Senescent cells

T2 - an emerging target for diseases of ageing

AU - Childs, Bennett G.

AU - Gluscevic, Martina

AU - Baker, Darren J

AU - Laberge, Remi Martin

AU - Marquess, Dan

AU - Dananberg, Jamie

AU - Van Deursen, Jan

PY - 2017/10/1

Y1 - 2017/10/1

N2 - Chronological age represents the single greatest risk factor for human disease. One plausible explanation for this correlation is that mechanisms that drive ageing might also promote age-related diseases. Cellular senescence, which is a permanent state of cell cycle arrest induced by cellular stress, has recently emerged as a fundamental ageing mechanism that also contributes to diseases of late life, including cancer, atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis. Therapeutic strategies that safely interfere with the detrimental effects of cellular senescence, such as the selective elimination of senescent cells (SNCs) or the disruption of the SNC secretome, are gaining significant attention, with several programmes now nearing human clinical studies.

AB - Chronological age represents the single greatest risk factor for human disease. One plausible explanation for this correlation is that mechanisms that drive ageing might also promote age-related diseases. Cellular senescence, which is a permanent state of cell cycle arrest induced by cellular stress, has recently emerged as a fundamental ageing mechanism that also contributes to diseases of late life, including cancer, atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis. Therapeutic strategies that safely interfere with the detrimental effects of cellular senescence, such as the selective elimination of senescent cells (SNCs) or the disruption of the SNC secretome, are gaining significant attention, with several programmes now nearing human clinical studies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030756466&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030756466&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nrd.2017.116

DO - 10.1038/nrd.2017.116

M3 - Review article

VL - 16

SP - 718

EP - 735

JO - Nature Reviews Drug Discovery

JF - Nature Reviews Drug Discovery

SN - 1474-1776

IS - 10

ER -