Self-perceived vs actual and desired weight and body mass index in adult ambulatory general internal medicine patients: A cross sectional study

Kirsten G. Mueller, Ryan T Hurt, Haitham S. Abu-Lebdeh, Paul Mueller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: No study has compared patients' self-reported heights and weights (and resultant self-reported body mass indexes [BMIs]) with their actual heights, weights, and BMIs; their self-perceived BMI categories; and their desired weights and BMIs and determined rates of clinicians' documented diagnoses of overweight and obesity in affected patients in a single patient group. The objectives of this study were to make these comparisons, determine patient factors associated with accurate self-perceived BMI categorization, and determine the frequency of clinicians' documented diagnoses of overweight and obesity in affected patients. Results: A total of 508 consecutive adult general internal medicine outpatients (257 women, 251 men; mean age, 62.9 ± 14.9 years) seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, between November 9 and 20, 2009, completed a questionnaire in which they reported their heights, weights, self-perceived BMI categories ("underweight," "about right," "overweight," or "obese"), and desired weights. These self-reported data were compared to actual heights, actual weights, and actual BMI categories (measured after the questionnaire was completed). Overall, 70% of the patients were overweight or obese. The average self-reported weight was significantly lower than the average actual weight (80.3 ± 20.1 kg vs 81.9 ± 21.1 kg; P <.001). The average self-reported BMI was significantly lower than the average actual BMI (27.6 ± 5.7 kg/m2 vs 28.3 ± 6.1 kg/m2; P <.001). Overall, 32% of patients had obesity; however, only 6% perceived they were obese. Accuracy of self-perceived BMI category decreased with higher actual BMI category (P <.001 for trend). Female sex, higher education level, smoking status, and lower BMI were associated with higher accuracy of self-perceived BMI category. Desired weight loss increased with higher self-perceived and actual BMI categories (P <.001 for trends). Of the 165 patients who actually were obese, only 40 (24%) had obesity documented as a diagnosis in their medical records by their clinicians. Statistical tests used were the paired t test, the Pearson Χ2 test, the Cochrane-Armitage trend test, the Wald test of marginal homogeneity, analysis of variance, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Conclusions: Many obese patients inaccurately perceive their BMI categories; accuracy decreases with increasing BMI. Clinicians should inform patients of their BMIs and prescribe treatment plans for those with overweight and obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number26
JournalBMC Obesity
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Internal Medicine
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Weights and Measures
Obesity
Sex Education
Thinness
Medical Records

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Diagnosis
  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Patient education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Self-perceived vs actual and desired weight and body mass index in adult ambulatory general internal medicine patients : A cross sectional study. / Mueller, Kirsten G.; Hurt, Ryan T; Abu-Lebdeh, Haitham S.; Mueller, Paul.

In: BMC Obesity, Vol. 1, No. 1, 26, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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