Selective Central Nervous System Calcium Channel Blockers—a New Class of Anticonvulsant Agents

FREDRIC B. MEYER, ROBERT E. ANDERSON, THORALF M. SUNDT, FRANK W. SHARBROUGH

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Current research suggests that Ca2+ flux into the neuron may be a critical factor in the genesis of seizures. We report herein the influence of nimodipine, a selective central nervous system calcium channel blocker, in 60 rabbits with seizures that had been induced through ischemia, postischemia reperfusion, pentylenetetrazol, and bicuculline. In 30 animals subjected to 4 hours of ischemia, 9 of the 15 control animals had seizures in comparison with 1 of the 15 treated animals (P<0.005). Five animals with reperfusion seizures demonstrated similar results. In 10 animals in which a convulsant was applied topically to both cerebral hemispheres, unilateral intracarotid injection of nimodipine arrested seizures in that hemisphere alone, whereas the control contralateral hemisphere continued to have electrical seizure activity (P<0.001). Both placebo and verapamil were ineffective. These results suggest that Ca2+ influx is a common biochemical precipitant for various types of experimental seizures. Selective central nervous system calcium channel blockers may prove to be a new class of anticonvulsant agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-247
Number of pages9
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

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Calcium Channels
Anticonvulsants
Seizures
Central Nervous System
Nimodipine
Calcium Channel Blockers
Reperfusion
Ischemia
Convulsants
Pentylenetetrazole
Bicuculline
Cerebrum
Verapamil
Placebos
Rabbits
Neurons
Injections
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

MEYER, FREDRIC. B., ANDERSON, ROBERT. E., SUNDT, THORALF. M., & SHARBROUGH, FRANK. W. (1986). Selective Central Nervous System Calcium Channel Blockers—a New Class of Anticonvulsant Agents. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 61(4), 239-247. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0025-6196(12)61922-3

Selective Central Nervous System Calcium Channel Blockers—a New Class of Anticonvulsant Agents. / MEYER, FREDRIC B.; ANDERSON, ROBERT E.; SUNDT, THORALF M.; SHARBROUGH, FRANK W.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 61, No. 4, 1986, p. 239-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

MEYER, FREDRICB, ANDERSON, ROBERTE, SUNDT, THORALFM & SHARBROUGH, FRANKW 1986, 'Selective Central Nervous System Calcium Channel Blockers—a New Class of Anticonvulsant Agents', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 239-247. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0025-6196(12)61922-3
MEYER, FREDRIC B. ; ANDERSON, ROBERT E. ; SUNDT, THORALF M. ; SHARBROUGH, FRANK W. / Selective Central Nervous System Calcium Channel Blockers—a New Class of Anticonvulsant Agents. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1986 ; Vol. 61, No. 4. pp. 239-247.
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