Seeding Open Innovation Drug Discovery and Translational Collaborations to Leverage Government Funding: A Case Study of Strategic Partnership between Sanford-Burnham and Mayo Clinic

Thomas D Y Chung, Sundeep Khosla, Andrew David Badley, Michael R. Jackson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The cost (well over $1 billion per compound) and duration (10-15 years) of traditional pharmaceutical research and development for drug discovery and development of a new drug as practiced by pharmaceutical companies ("big pharma") has come under increased scrutiny and assault from disease advocacy groups, government, and investment communities as being too high and long, stagnant, and unsustainable. These communities have all called for new innovative business models for drug discovery and development, in particular new models in which the participation of the best of academia is used to catalyze innovation and translational research. Indeed, several large initiatives and programs for "open innovation," such as the National Institutes of Health's "Roadmap" and Molecular Libraries Initiative/Program and, more recently, the formation of the National Center for the Advancement of Translational Sciences, are tangible responses to this deficit that has provided a promise for future funding of translational research. We describe in this chapter the critical components of infrastructure and drug discovery core competencies and capabilities that have allowed the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics (CPCCG) at the Sanford|Burnham Medical Research Institute to contribute in new models of academic drug discovery and development. We provide a case study of our strategic alliance and partnership with the Mayo Clinic detailing (1) how the two organizations selected each other, (2) the key cultural and operational governance models that drove strong alignment, and (3) how the Prebys Center acted as an effective partner to leverage NIH funds toward advancing a drug discovery initiative within this collaboration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCollaborative Innovation in Drug Discovery: Strategies for Public and Private Partnerships
PublisherWiley Blackwell
Pages451-486
Number of pages36
ISBN (Print)9781118778166, 9780470917374
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 14 2014

Fingerprint

Drug Discovery
Innovation
Translational Medical Research
Drug products
Pharmaceutical Preparations
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Financial Management
Genomics
Biomedical Research
Industry
Health
Organizations
Costs and Cost Analysis
Research
Costs

Keywords

  • Academic drug discovery
  • Drug discovery and development
  • High-throughput screening
  • MLSCN and MLPCN
  • Molecular Libraries Roadmap
  • NCATS
  • Open innovation
  • Pharma stagnation
  • Project and portfolio management
  • Strategic alliances or partnerships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Chung, T. D. Y., Khosla, S., Badley, A. D., & Jackson, M. R. (2014). Seeding Open Innovation Drug Discovery and Translational Collaborations to Leverage Government Funding: A Case Study of Strategic Partnership between Sanford-Burnham and Mayo Clinic. In Collaborative Innovation in Drug Discovery: Strategies for Public and Private Partnerships (pp. 451-486). Wiley Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118778166.ch27

Seeding Open Innovation Drug Discovery and Translational Collaborations to Leverage Government Funding : A Case Study of Strategic Partnership between Sanford-Burnham and Mayo Clinic. / Chung, Thomas D Y; Khosla, Sundeep; Badley, Andrew David; Jackson, Michael R.

Collaborative Innovation in Drug Discovery: Strategies for Public and Private Partnerships. Wiley Blackwell, 2014. p. 451-486.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Chung, Thomas D Y ; Khosla, Sundeep ; Badley, Andrew David ; Jackson, Michael R. / Seeding Open Innovation Drug Discovery and Translational Collaborations to Leverage Government Funding : A Case Study of Strategic Partnership between Sanford-Burnham and Mayo Clinic. Collaborative Innovation in Drug Discovery: Strategies for Public and Private Partnerships. Wiley Blackwell, 2014. pp. 451-486
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