Screening for cervical cancer and initial treatment of patients with abnormal results from papanicolaou testing

John B. Bundrick, David Allan Cook, Bobbie S. Gostout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

New techniques for cervical cancer screening and a better understanding of the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical neoplasia have inspired a quest for more rational screening strategies for cervical cancer. Often, screening intervals for women older than 30 years can be expanded safely to every 3 years, and experts now agree that screening may cease after hysterectomy and in elderly women (provided certain criteria have been met). Liquid-based cytology produces more satisfactory specimens than conventional testing and offers the valuable option of treating atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance by "reflex" testing for high-risk types of HPV on the original specimen. Testing for HPV as an adjunct to cervical cytology for primary screening is now considered reasonable for many women older than 30 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1063-1068
Number of pages6
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume80
Issue number8
StatePublished - 2005

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Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Cell Biology
Natural History
Hysterectomy
Early Detection of Cancer
Reflex
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Atypical Squamous Cells of the Cervix

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Screening for cervical cancer and initial treatment of patients with abnormal results from papanicolaou testing. / Bundrick, John B.; Cook, David Allan; Gostout, Bobbie S.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 80, No. 8, 2005, p. 1063-1068.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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