Scleral lenses in the management of keratoconus

Muriel M. Schornack, Sanjay V. Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the use of Jupiter scleral lenses (Medlens Innovations, Front Royal, VA; and Essilor Contact Lenses, Inc., Dallas, TX) in the management of keratoconus. Methods: We performed a single-center retrospective chart review of our initial 32 patients with keratoconus evaluated for scleral lens wear. All patients were referred for scleral lens evaluation after exhausting other nonsurgical options for visual correction. Diagnostic lenses were used in the initial fitting process. If adequate fit could not be achieved with standard lenses, custom lenses were designed in consultation with the manufacturers' specialists. The following measures were evaluated for each patient: ability to tolerate and handle lenses, visual acuity with scleral lenses, number of lenses, and visits needed to complete the fitting process. Results: Fifty-two eyes of 32 patients were evaluated for scleral lens wear. Of these, 12 patients (20 eyes) decided not to pursue scleral lens wear after initial evaluation. One patient (2 eyes) abandoned the fitting process after cataract surgery. The remaining 19 patients (30 eyes) were fit successfully. The average number of lenses ordered per eye was 1.5. The fitting process required an average of 2.8 visits. Standard lenses were prescribed for 23 eyes, and custom designs were needed for 7 eyes. Median best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/40 (mean, 20/76) before scleral lens fitting to 20/20 (mean, 20/30) after fitting. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 32 months. Conclusions: Jupiter scleral lenses provide acceptable visual acuity and comfort in patients with keratoconus. The availability of diagnostic lenses facilitates the fitting process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalEye and Contact Lens
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • Ectasia
  • Keratoconus
  • Scleral contact lenses
  • Visual acuity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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