Saphenous vein bypass grafts for giant ameurysms and intracranial occlusive disease

T. M. Sundt, D. G. Piepgras, W. R. Marsh, N. C. Fode

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors report their experience with the use of saphenous vein bypass grafts for treating advanced occlusive disease in the posterior circulation (77 patients, all of whom had failed medical management and showed severe ischemic symptoms), deteriorating patients with giant aneurysms of the posterior circulation (nine patients), progressive ischemia in the anterior circulation (26 patients, none of whom had a normal examination), and giant aneurysms in the anterior circulation (20 patients, all of whom presented with mass effect or subarachnoid hemorrhage). Graft patency in the first 65 cases treated was 74%. However, after significant technical changes of vein graft preparation and construction of the proximal anastomosis, patency in the following 67 cases was 94%. Excellent or good results (including relief of deficits existing prior to surgery) were achieved in 71% of patients with advanced occlusive disease in the posterior circulation, 44% of those with giant aneurysms of the posterior circulation, 58% of those with ischemia of the anterior circulation, and 80% of those with giant aneurysms of the anterior circulation. Mean graft blood flow at surgery in the series was 100 ml/min for posterior circulation grafts and 110 ml/min for anterior circulation grafts. Experience to date indicates that this is a useful operation, and is particularly applicable to patients who are neurologically unstable from advanced intracranial occlusive disease in the posterior circulation or with giant aneurysms in the anterior circulation. The risk of hyperperfusion breakthrough with intracerebral hematoma restricts the technique in patients with progressing ischemic symptoms in the anterior circulation, and the intolerance of patients with fusiform aneurysms in the posterior circulation to the iatrogenic vertebrobasilar occlusion limits the applicability of this approach to otherwise inoperable lesions in that system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-450
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume65
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Saphenous Vein
Transplants
Aneurysm
Ischemia
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Hematoma
Veins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Sundt, T. M., Piepgras, D. G., Marsh, W. R., & Fode, N. C. (1986). Saphenous vein bypass grafts for giant ameurysms and intracranial occlusive disease. Journal of Neurosurgery, 65(4), 439-450.

Saphenous vein bypass grafts for giant ameurysms and intracranial occlusive disease. / Sundt, T. M.; Piepgras, D. G.; Marsh, W. R.; Fode, N. C.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 65, No. 4, 1986, p. 439-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sundt, TM, Piepgras, DG, Marsh, WR & Fode, NC 1986, 'Saphenous vein bypass grafts for giant ameurysms and intracranial occlusive disease', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 65, no. 4, pp. 439-450.
Sundt, T. M. ; Piepgras, D. G. ; Marsh, W. R. ; Fode, N. C. / Saphenous vein bypass grafts for giant ameurysms and intracranial occlusive disease. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1986 ; Vol. 65, No. 4. pp. 439-450.
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