Safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty: The Mayo Clinic experience

James L. Orford, Panayotis Fasseas, Ali E. Denktas, La Von Hammes, Kirk N. Garratt, Peter B. Berger, David Holmes, Gregory W. Barsness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A number of evolving clinical indications for cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA) have been described in the clinical literature, including angioplastyresistant stenoses, in-stent restenosis, ostial lesions and small vessel disease. Methods. We analyzed the Mayo Clinic PTCA registry and report procedural and in-hospital clinical outcomes in 100 patients (103 procedures, 114 lesions) undergoing CBA. Results. CBA was successfully completed in 109 lesions (96%). The majority of lesions (73%) required additional treatment with either balloon angioplasty (39%) or stent implantation (34%). Severe intimal dissection resulting in at least 50% luminal obstruction occurred in 13 lesions (11%). A single incident of branch occlusion was documented, resulting in ST elevation myocardial infarction. There were no incidents of vessel perforation, urgent percutaneous or surgical target vessel revascularization, or in-hospital death. Conclusion. CBA is feasible and safe, with a low incidence of procedural complications and in-hospital adverse cardiac events when used primarily for in-stent restenosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)720-724
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Invasive Cardiology
Volume14
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

Fingerprint

Balloon Angioplasty
Safety
Stents
Tunica Intima
Registries
Dissection
Pathologic Constriction
Incidence

Keywords

  • Dissection
  • Perforation
  • Restenosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Orford, J. L., Fasseas, P., Denktas, A. E., Hammes, L. V., Garratt, K. N., Berger, P. B., ... Barsness, G. W. (2002). Safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty: The Mayo Clinic experience. Journal of Invasive Cardiology, 14(12), 720-724.

Safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty : The Mayo Clinic experience. / Orford, James L.; Fasseas, Panayotis; Denktas, Ali E.; Hammes, La Von; Garratt, Kirk N.; Berger, Peter B.; Holmes, David; Barsness, Gregory W.

In: Journal of Invasive Cardiology, Vol. 14, No. 12, 01.12.2002, p. 720-724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Orford, JL, Fasseas, P, Denktas, AE, Hammes, LV, Garratt, KN, Berger, PB, Holmes, D & Barsness, GW 2002, 'Safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty: The Mayo Clinic experience', Journal of Invasive Cardiology, vol. 14, no. 12, pp. 720-724.
Orford JL, Fasseas P, Denktas AE, Hammes LV, Garratt KN, Berger PB et al. Safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty: The Mayo Clinic experience. Journal of Invasive Cardiology. 2002 Dec 1;14(12):720-724.
Orford, James L. ; Fasseas, Panayotis ; Denktas, Ali E. ; Hammes, La Von ; Garratt, Kirk N. ; Berger, Peter B. ; Holmes, David ; Barsness, Gregory W. / Safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty : The Mayo Clinic experience. In: Journal of Invasive Cardiology. 2002 ; Vol. 14, No. 12. pp. 720-724.
@article{6ec7236498464de9a8f5f479498afe8c,
title = "Safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty: The Mayo Clinic experience",
abstract = "A number of evolving clinical indications for cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA) have been described in the clinical literature, including angioplastyresistant stenoses, in-stent restenosis, ostial lesions and small vessel disease. Methods. We analyzed the Mayo Clinic PTCA registry and report procedural and in-hospital clinical outcomes in 100 patients (103 procedures, 114 lesions) undergoing CBA. Results. CBA was successfully completed in 109 lesions (96{\%}). The majority of lesions (73{\%}) required additional treatment with either balloon angioplasty (39{\%}) or stent implantation (34{\%}). Severe intimal dissection resulting in at least 50{\%} luminal obstruction occurred in 13 lesions (11{\%}). A single incident of branch occlusion was documented, resulting in ST elevation myocardial infarction. There were no incidents of vessel perforation, urgent percutaneous or surgical target vessel revascularization, or in-hospital death. Conclusion. CBA is feasible and safe, with a low incidence of procedural complications and in-hospital adverse cardiac events when used primarily for in-stent restenosis.",
keywords = "Dissection, Perforation, Restenosis",
author = "Orford, {James L.} and Panayotis Fasseas and Denktas, {Ali E.} and Hammes, {La Von} and Garratt, {Kirk N.} and Berger, {Peter B.} and David Holmes and Barsness, {Gregory W.}",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "720--724",
journal = "Journal of Invasive Cardiology",
issn = "1042-3931",
publisher = "HMP Communications",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty

T2 - The Mayo Clinic experience

AU - Orford, James L.

AU - Fasseas, Panayotis

AU - Denktas, Ali E.

AU - Hammes, La Von

AU - Garratt, Kirk N.

AU - Berger, Peter B.

AU - Holmes, David

AU - Barsness, Gregory W.

PY - 2002/12/1

Y1 - 2002/12/1

N2 - A number of evolving clinical indications for cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA) have been described in the clinical literature, including angioplastyresistant stenoses, in-stent restenosis, ostial lesions and small vessel disease. Methods. We analyzed the Mayo Clinic PTCA registry and report procedural and in-hospital clinical outcomes in 100 patients (103 procedures, 114 lesions) undergoing CBA. Results. CBA was successfully completed in 109 lesions (96%). The majority of lesions (73%) required additional treatment with either balloon angioplasty (39%) or stent implantation (34%). Severe intimal dissection resulting in at least 50% luminal obstruction occurred in 13 lesions (11%). A single incident of branch occlusion was documented, resulting in ST elevation myocardial infarction. There were no incidents of vessel perforation, urgent percutaneous or surgical target vessel revascularization, or in-hospital death. Conclusion. CBA is feasible and safe, with a low incidence of procedural complications and in-hospital adverse cardiac events when used primarily for in-stent restenosis.

AB - A number of evolving clinical indications for cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA) have been described in the clinical literature, including angioplastyresistant stenoses, in-stent restenosis, ostial lesions and small vessel disease. Methods. We analyzed the Mayo Clinic PTCA registry and report procedural and in-hospital clinical outcomes in 100 patients (103 procedures, 114 lesions) undergoing CBA. Results. CBA was successfully completed in 109 lesions (96%). The majority of lesions (73%) required additional treatment with either balloon angioplasty (39%) or stent implantation (34%). Severe intimal dissection resulting in at least 50% luminal obstruction occurred in 13 lesions (11%). A single incident of branch occlusion was documented, resulting in ST elevation myocardial infarction. There were no incidents of vessel perforation, urgent percutaneous or surgical target vessel revascularization, or in-hospital death. Conclusion. CBA is feasible and safe, with a low incidence of procedural complications and in-hospital adverse cardiac events when used primarily for in-stent restenosis.

KW - Dissection

KW - Perforation

KW - Restenosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036916827&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036916827&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12454332

AN - SCOPUS:0036916827

VL - 14

SP - 720

EP - 724

JO - Journal of Invasive Cardiology

JF - Journal of Invasive Cardiology

SN - 1042-3931

IS - 12

ER -