Sacral tumor resection: The effect of surgical staging on patient outcomes, resource management, and hospital cost

Michael J. Brown, Daryl J. Kor, Timothy B. Curry, Matthew A. Warner, Eduardo S. Rodrigues, Steven H. Rose, Mark B. Dekutoski, James P. Moriarty, Kirsten Hall Long, Peter S. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Design. Single-institution retrospective study. Objective. To assess the effect surgical staging (i.e., sequencing) has on clinical and economic outcomes for patients undergoing sacropelvic tumor resection requiring lumbopelvic stabilization. Summary of Background Data. Sacral corpectomy with lumbopelvic stabilization is an extensive surgical procedure that can be performed in either a single episode or multiple episodes of care on different days. The impact of varied sequencing of surgical episodes of care on patient, resource, and financial outcomes is unknown. Methods. This single-center retrospective case series identified all cases of sacropelvic tumor resection requiring lumbopelvic stabilization over an 8-year period. We assessed and compared clinical and economic outcomes for patients whose anterior exposure and posterior resection were separated into two distinct surgical episodes of care (staged) versus patients whose anterior exposure and posterior resection occurred in a single encounter (nonstaged procedures). Primary endpoints included procedural outcomes (operative and after-hours surgical time), resuscitative requirements, adverse perioperative events, mortality, and direct medical costs (hospital and physician) associated with the surgical episodes of interest. Results. From January 1, 2000, to July 15, 2008, a total of 25 patients were identified. Eight patients had their procedure staged. Surgical staging was associated with a significant increase in intensive care unit free days (P = 0.03), ventilator free days (P < 0.01), and reduced morbidity (P < 0.01). Surgical staging significantly reduced postoperative red blood cell (P = 0.03), and after-hours red blood cell (P < 0.01) and component requirements (P = 0.04). Mean total inpatient costs were $89,132 lower for patients undergoing the staged procedure (95% confidence interval of mean cost difference = -$178,899 to -$4661). Conclusion. Separating the anterior exposure and posterior resection phases of complex sacral tumor resection into two separate surgical episodes of care is associated with improved clinical outcomes and reduced inpatient cost.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1570-1578
Number of pages9
JournalSpine
Volume36
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

Keywords

  • clinical outcomes
  • cost of care
  • resource utilization
  • sacrectomy
  • surgical staging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

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